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Author Topic: Forged Knife  (Read 1352 times)
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Israel
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« on: May 20, 2009, 11:49:55 PM »

Ok, finally got on photobucket. been trying to post these all day.  Here is the knife that Steve and I started over at Chris's shop.  As you can see in the pics we still have a few scratches to work out.  Not sure how far we will get here, things are going to get busy for a few days, but we will work on it when we can and I will post new pics.




   

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Mike_H
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« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2009, 12:57:41 AM »

damn, I hope my first blade comes out as nice.  Great Job.
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PhilL
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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2009, 12:58:16 AM »

Nice work guys, I'm sure you'll have the time to hand sand and get out those scratches.
I know you had a good teacher in Chris and that he gave you the start of a shop. But, will you guys be able to make similar knives where you're going?
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Israel
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2009, 01:09:47 AM »

thanks for the compliments guys. though this is our first forged knife we have both made a couple of stock removal, but i definetly prefer the forged blade. so much more fun to make.

we should be able to. we just found out that we will be able to take small propane bottles with us so that will help. we will also have access to charwood, have to do some experimenting with it. the biggest problem is going to be a proper heat treat. but chris suggested the primitive knife video by tim lively. it has some good tips using primitive technology.  also with the tools that chris gave us we should be able to turn out some decent blades.
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kbaknife
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« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2009, 01:46:09 AM »

Looks like it would work well for many tasks.
Though you may have considered it before, allow me to give some advice when it comes to sanding out scratches:
When you're "sanding out" scratches, you're not really sanding scratches.
You're sanding everything that is NOT a scratch!
The scratches don't leave until you bring all of the rest of the material DOWN even with the BOTTOM of the scratches!
To put it simply, the MORE scratches you have, the less material you have to sand DOWN to the bottom of the scratches!
So, do a REALLY good job with the sanding belts as you grind.
If you just do a quick grinding job, then you've left yourself a LOT of handwork.
Go through your belt progressions slooooowly and completely, and when you get done, the hand work is a breeze, because you won't have any deep scratches left. 
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2009, 03:51:37 AM »

Israel: Looks like you have a great one on the way!
A little tip: Great knives come from many little things done right.
Picking on a little tip that fits where you are now - Sanding the scratches will actually cold work the steel to a slight degree. When you sand - sand parallel to the cutting edge to increase lateral strength and toughness! I learned this little tip reading about aircraft parts that failed when final sanding and polishing failed to take this "little" tip into consideration. Final sanding and polishing from edge to spine and you do not get the most out of your future blade. I wondered when I first heard about this, now after reading about it in theory from other sources and testing blades find it is real. Not catastrophic error, but just one of the little things. Many will laugh off this concept, but if you keep it in mind you may find it useful one day.

If you etch your blade you will find that scratches may penetrate into the steel below the bottom of the scratch. This penetration is a function of thermal cycles and time. I like to go to a 220 finish on my blades as quickly as possible to reduce this influence.  Entire books are devoted to polishing steel for this reason and naturally more.

Also: be sure and clamp the blade onto a form fitting board to keep the edge from drawing your blood first while sanding or polishing by hand.
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Israel
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« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2009, 01:36:46 PM »

Our biggest problem is that we don't yet have all the proper belts, gonna order some here soon. so we've been doing everything by hand and some on the buffer wheel. As for those scratches going from spine to edge, not sure where those came from.  Thanks for all the advice.

I think we are going to need a support group though, at least I am. Was at the local watering hole last night and while most of the guys were chasing women, i found myself looking at all the trophy animals on the wall, thinking about knife handles and blades.  what has happened to me?
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Mike_H
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« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2009, 11:13:48 PM »

yeah, it's an illness but one we're glad to have! Grin
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