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radicat
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« on: February 09, 2007, 12:23:09 AM »

     Hello fellow collectors. Can you believe it? Knife Talk Online has dedicated a category to collectors of knives and related items. Let's see if we can kick it off now. I'm an aspiring knifemaker, but I'm also a collector. Not a big-time collector like many that will visit this site, but a collector. Most professional knifemakers are collectors and may have started out collecting and decided they would try their hand at creating their own "perfect" knife.
     You will find examples of the custom made knives and others in the Gallery and Production knife sections. You might choose to start a collection of their fine knives. Myself, I'd like to own all of them, but that would be selfish of me. You will be fascinated by the discussions among the makers and learn something about how the makers of all knives create what we collect. You can communicate with them about the processes involved.
     We as collectors have an opportunity to build something of great value to the hobby and make it a success unlike any other collector related forum. The creators of this forum are experts in their field and we all share a common passion, the love of all things sharp. There are no hard fast rules, other than those established by the administrators to maintain an atmosphere of decency and honesty. We will evolve as we go along, coming up with ideas and workable processes to the benefit of us all.
     To begin, take a look at the topics. You can do a search if you'd like. If you don't find your topic of interest, as a member, you can start your own topic. As a member you can select "Reply" to post under any topic, send messages, and much more. Don't forget to log in first. Browse around to get a feel for what's being done. Again, this is our part of this forum to develop together. Discuss with one another any aspect of the hobby and make suggestions to find ways to improve the forum.
     If you want to buy, sell, or trade, above all, be honest. This is not 'ebay'. If you want to negotiate a deal, make contact through the message feature to exchange contact information and do the deal elsewhere. Post any contact information that you want, but if you want to keep it private, use the message feature. Remember, non-members can't use the message feature. PLEASE DON'T POST A LONG LIST OF KNIVES THAT YOU WANT TO SELL. Instead, invite others to contact you for a listing by e-mail. Otherwise we would have a thousand lines of price lists to get through every other posting. Sure, it won't hurt to name a very few knives, but do the negotiating of price elsewhere. Respect the other members and non-members alike.
     You should learn the forum features as you can. You can modify your posting, send messages, and much more. Ask others about features that they are using. See how the knifemakers are using the features in their postings, especially the photo and video capabilities. Photos of a knife that you're discussing will be helpful.
     The types of collections and commonly collected name brands is endless. If you want, you can start a topic that is more specific than what has already been started, such as Case whittler. But, don't miss out on what is going on in the main Case topic. Try not to duplicate, but if you do, don't worry about it. It will all work out. We don't need to get excited about the small stuff. We are here to have fun with the hobby we love. Use this topic to make suggestions, ask questions, give helpful tips, and help others.                               
                                     HAPPY COLLECTING
« Last Edit: February 09, 2007, 11:44:53 PM by radicat » Logged
 
wlscowboy
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« Reply #31 on: December 23, 2008, 08:39:40 AM »

Ed you truly astound me with the amount of knowledge you possess right off of the top of your head.. I can?t remember names or quotes from passages that I?ve read from some book to save my life.. But I do know what a anvil is suppose to sound like, if that old boy came striking my anvil with a hammer everyday about the third day he would find a piece of metal to be hitting..
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #32 on: December 23, 2008, 04:47:13 PM »

Joe was raised in Hungary, his trade school was taught by true masters. Joe made Damascus out of scrap in the 50's, came to America during the Hungarian - Russian revolution attempt. Learned to read and speak english reading comic books, the pictures helped. When ever you see his work at a show look it over closely, He learned a lot from Jim Schmidt about the art of the knife. I watched him forge a tomahawk out of a rail road spike, there was not enough slag on the anvil to cover your thumb nail. He is truly one of our top smiths.Testing one of his knives, he cut up an old Volvo. His art, engraving and relief carving of steel is unsurpassed and all done free hand.

Many of his designs have been purloined by other maker and become factory - maker collaborations that
went on to become very popular.

He is one of our true masters and is truly a good guy!
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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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radicat
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« Reply #33 on: December 24, 2008, 07:08:25 AM »

Did you know that a new section of railroad track has a different sound when struck by a hammer than does an old section next to it? The older one has been hammered thousands of times by wheels and particularly the wheels of the locomotive with the additional forces inherent to them.

That bit of trivia and $1.50 will get you a cup of coffee anywhere. 
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jonet143
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« Reply #34 on: December 25, 2008, 05:34:14 PM »

merry christmas to all on this great site.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #35 on: December 25, 2008, 11:09:35 PM »

Simply because the sound of used was higher pitched I figured used ball bearings were better stock for knives. It only took me 10 years to learn that was not true - for forged blades anyway. "There is nothing good happnes to steel being used (excluding work hardening in special applications like the anvil discussed)"
I tried used RR rail vs new - no  difference in the knives, if Rex would have been around with his microscope we may have learned more.
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davidm
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« Reply #36 on: December 26, 2008, 04:04:54 AM »

Ed,
I do remember hearing something about this story, from you several years ago...

Can you repeat it, for clarification. About Joe - as a student,  having to work on the anvil for an extended time before forging anything, to hear it ring correctly?  (.. and the purpose?)
David
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #37 on: December 26, 2008, 05:27:18 AM »

The way I remember it, Joe was to go to a trade school, he chose to be a mechanic (fine tuned black smith in Hungary at the time). The first day at school the master let them to the shop, each student was assigned an anvil and a hammer. The anvils were dead, no ring, no bounce.

The instructor (master) showed them how to hit the anvil with the flat of their hammers and showed then the pattern they were to hammer on the anvils. The kids start hammering, every few days the instructor would come and examine their work, he demanded nice flat surfaces, no dings from the edge of the hammer.

Later he would come in and strike the anvils with his hammer and show the student where he needed to work and they continued until their anvils were as nice as our "professional" anvils. Ring like a bell, bounce a ball bearing and were what you would call well tuned.

Then they learned how to forge steel and non ferrous metals.  Joe can make a hammer handle quicker than you can go buy one, they learned to make gears and machines from scratch. Joe can file as true as most milling machines or surface grinders. Hungary did not have a lot of fancy industrial machines at the time, they made their own from scratch.

The diplomas Joe received from his schools were singed my masters who has spent a lifetime learning and judged for function as well as fit and finish.  No one became a master in 5 years, it was a lifetime of study.
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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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