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Author Topic: #3 knife for my boss  (Read 7264 times)
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Alan
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« on: January 21, 2007, 04:56:04 PM »

OK.....this is it....with any luck at all I will be able to finish this last knife off this week .
After I finish this last knife , Im going to totally redo my whole shop.

I have finished a bunch of knives this winter, and I have been thinking all along this path how I really need things set up differently.

My forge is in the wrong position.
The anvil is totally wrong, and not only needs to be set at a different place it also needs a different support to get it up higher off the floor.

The beltgrinder is turned the wrong way, I also note that i would like to remount the grinder so that there is nothing underneath the wheel.

I dont like the position of my drillpress nor of my metal-cutting bandsaw.

The whole workbench situation is a disaster!.....anyone seen my workbench ?....last I saw it was about 2004
I would like to bring in one of them huge roll-off dumpsters and fill it with the crap i have collected...then I would like to strip the walls of everything, and build all new workbenches,,,I would like a place to weld thats not on the floor too..
And I would like a place all by itself for the Micarta work thats so messy.    



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« Last Edit: January 21, 2007, 06:07:39 PM by Alan » Logged
Alan
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« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2007, 05:18:50 PM »

DAY 1
(The start)
One of the more tricky things I do is buff clean the ball bearing before I weld it to a rod.
Today I had to chase after this darn bearing about 10 times when it got whipped out of my fingers and flung across the shop.

When I design my new shop area Im going to come up with some way to catch things that spin out of the buffer.  I cant tell you the numbver of knives I watched get a blunt point because of the buffer tossing them down onto the floor...Why do that always fall tip down?



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« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 08:05:49 PM by Alan » Logged
Alan
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« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2007, 05:40:56 PM »

The biggest problem with my beltgrinder is that I have some of the support bench underneath the spinning wheel.  This has been driving me nuts this winter as it keeps me from useing the curves of the wheel.

Im not sure where and how I will remount the grinder, i just know that i have to do something new next time.


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Alan
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2007, 05:44:42 PM »

I have to do my welding on the floor...thats just not going to cut it in the future.
I need a real welding table,,something made of mild steel that cant burn.
I dont need a very big section to weld on, just a few feet to be able to stand up and weld..

I place the ball bearing on a type of washer I found in the junk and that keeps it in place as I weld it.


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Alan
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2007, 05:49:37 PM »

About 4 years ago my wife got me one of them auto-dark welding masks...They are GREAT!...
The mask allows me to see what Im doing without needing to flip the thing up and down all the time.
Im not a welder, I never took it in school and really dont have a clue what im doing.
But I have had to learn enough about welding to get the ball bearing welded to a support rod.


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Alan
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2007, 05:58:01 PM »

When I finally get around to fireing up the forge and banging some steel I have to have my wife help me.
I didnt get any photos of the early forge work tonight, we were just too busy, but this is a bit later when i switched to my next size down hammer.

I think that down the line in the future I will try to snag a real power hammer from some guy.
The forge work went well tonight.  I got it forged  to about the shape I wanted.
The blade will be about 4 &1/2 inches long.


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Alan
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2007, 06:05:09 PM »


The guys at work always ask me , "Why bother with a forge when I could just get a steel ready to grind?"
But I think that part of the fun of saying "I made this knife" is that I can really hold my head up when they ask about the steel.

Im the guy who formed the steel into the shape I wanted...the blade is the length it is  not because thats the way it came in the mail, but rather it's because I made it that way...
There is something nice about being able to change the steel to fit the idea I have for this knife,,,,

But I really got to move the place I bang on the steel.  Right now it's far away from the forge, and it's too low for my size.
I also need a better way to mount things so that when i hit as hard as I can, the whole thing does not slide around on the floor.


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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2007, 07:31:42 PM »

When it comes to your shop, be open minded when you go to garage sales and acutions. Many times I passed up something I could have used because my mind was focused on what I needed immediately.

Don't be bashful about picking up a welding table way bigger than you need if the price is right.

The new welding masks are great. Don't forget to clean the glass, I figured mine was OK, but when another man took the time to clean the glass I found I could see much better!!

A power hammer is a dream come true. I own 5 of them and use them all the time. I have a line on another one, but the man has not made the decision to sell - yet.

Today you are interested in making a knife as you forge. You have watched our DVD and are aware of the potential of forging can provide. As you gain in techniques you will find your forging is not only for shape but performance. I ask only one thing from you, if you ever decide to forge a blade with a dropped edge below the ricasso, please don't let me know about it.

Practice all you can, get the methods down and I hope that one day you will be able to take a trip to Riverton. You will benefit greatly, with your desire and enthusiasm you can do very well for both yourself as well as your clients.
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Alan
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2007, 09:15:20 AM »

Day 2
(the plan)

Today I plan to go out to my shop and do a little blade work.
First I plan to take the blade out of the forge where it annealed overnight and grind some of the scale off of it.
I then will come into the house and work with the pattern .
I like to draw out and cut/glue a paper pattern onto the steel.  It's my basic stock-removal way to go.

I paint the steel and then strip off the paper pattern to show me where to grind down to.
After I have the outline of the blade ground down to where I want, I then will start to grind the flats of the blade.

With luck I should be able to get the profile and flats finished before I stop to eat today.
After that, its time to work the belts in order and then start to grind down the cutting edge.
It would be nice to have the blade ready to Heat-treat by tonight.
Here we go...
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 09:17:46 AM by Alan » Logged
Alan
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2007, 10:16:08 AM »

I cleaned the sides a bit on the grinder to be able to glue the pattern on


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Alan
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« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2007, 10:20:06 AM »

I draw a paper pattern that can fit inside the knife profile.
This is to allow me to see where to do the normal stock removal .

I then use a craft glue and stick the paper pattern to the steel.
I see that Im not very happy now with the way the tang is.  I guess that down the line I can heat the tang and bend it to the more correct place and more in line with the blade.
I didnt notice this problem until I started to draw the pattern.


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Alan
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« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2007, 10:22:26 AM »

once the pattern is in place, I paint the whole blade with a white color.
I like to use white as it sets off the border better later.





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Alan
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« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2007, 10:24:31 AM »

once the paint is dry (I use a hair dryer to speed things up), I then just strip away the paper pattern.
What is left then is a shadow of the paper pattern that shown me jhust where to stop my grinding.


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Alan
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« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2007, 10:53:50 AM »

the blade is now profiled on the grinder.
The next step I do is to begin to grind the flat sides.


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Alan
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« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2007, 12:41:05 PM »

I have sanded the flats now up to about 320 grit.

I next have to decide where the plunge will go, Most of the time I like a 3/4 inch ricaso area ahead of the brass guard.
3/4 inch is about right as by the time Im done it has gotten about a 1/4 inch longer and ends up with near a 1 inch lentgh to the ricaso anyway.
Most of the guys I show my knives to dont really get the whole ricaso area...they dont see the point.
For that matter, most of the guys I work with dont like the brass guard too.
They are used to blades without guards that are sharp right up to the handle.


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