Knife Talk Online Forums
  Home membership Help Search Calendar Members Classifieds Treasury Store Links Gallery Media Center Login Register  
Custom Search
Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Down
  Send this topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: The REAL Bowie Knife  (Read 47136 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
caknives
Global Moderator
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 592


View Profile
« on: February 17, 2008, 03:51:05 PM »

How bout it ? What do you guys think ? The Moore, Musso, Todd, Bowie 1, something else entirely ? I just finished an article that said Jim Bowie was quite a fancier of knives and most likley had several dozen. Could they all be "the Bowie knife" ?    

Logged

Don't take life to seriously, you'll never make it out alive.  - Van Wilder
DanatSavageSmith
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Full Member
***
Posts: 56


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2008, 04:13:56 PM »

I think that the "Real" Bowie knife much like "the real hero" is something each person has to define for themself.  Designs and functions vary widely and I feel that the name "Bowie" as pertains to a knife has expanded much farther than that legendary customer and has become an ideal of sorts, not just a style, but a tribute to our history.  In my limited experience, the "Real" Bowie Knife may be any or all of the following: the one on your side, the one you made, the one you can rely on or the one you love. 

-Dan
Logged

Aun Aprendo, Noli non legitime carbor undem est.
www.savagesmith.com
caknives
Global Moderator
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 592


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2008, 06:08:40 PM »

I agree, as Ed as said we all seek our own version of the "Iron Mistress". I was actually just wondering if anyone had any thoughts or opinions as to the claims made by these well known and famous bowies about thier heritage. I've seen the real Moore knife and the real Bowie 1. The Bowie 1 seems to fit the sandbar description and the Moore knife has to be taken on faith. Any or both could be "it". I think if I'm not mistaken it could of even been the Huber. What do you guys think, could the Huber have been at the Alamo ?
Logged

Don't take life to seriously, you'll never make it out alive.  - Van Wilder
DanatSavageSmith
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Full Member
***
Posts: 56


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2008, 07:43:52 PM »

Oops,
Back to the history books for me, I'll come back better educated. Smiley

-Dan
Logged

Aun Aprendo, Noli non legitime carbor undem est.
www.savagesmith.com
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3503



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2008, 11:52:05 PM »

I believe the Huber was at the Alamo. It would not have been called a Bowie at that time, from all I read they were called butcher knives. I think the label Bowie knife came after the Alamo. All mention of knives in "Alamo Traces" written at the time calls the knives butcher knives. In reading Jeff Longs book, "Duel of Eagles"  he uses the term Bowie Knife, probably because that is what the readers would identify with.

While trying to find more information about the Huber my reading has shown many of my heroes to have feet of clay. Jackson and land speculators wanted Texas, treaty's prevented the states from any participation, therefor mercenaries from the north became "Texans" fighting for independence who were offered vast lands for their help. I have the feeling that any big purchase of Hubers headed for Texas would have been a well guarded secret.

I have not enjoyed what I am reading, but have learned a lot of history.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2008, 08:07:56 AM by Ed Fowler » Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2008, 01:36:36 AM »

Sam Houston was another scoundrel. If he had the opportunity to hoard those knives for the army he was building while the men at the Alamo were being used as sacrificial lambs, he would have. The only other large body of men that I can remember were at Goliad. All murdered after they surrendered to the Mexican Army. Somewhere down there in a small-town museum there is probably one of those knives from that shipment. If they were in the hands of the mercenaries at San Jacinto, they served a good purpose.

Too bad one wasn't used on SanTana there.
Logged
Unsub
Trade Count: (0)
Full Member
***
Posts: 51


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2008, 05:04:53 PM »

I don't mind finding out the truth behind the myths. In fact I like the idea that a bunch of crooked land speculators and mercs fighting for slavery could have inspired so many positive feelings and actions. It also helps to temper the use of these myths by unscrupulous people.
As a Canadian I see the US from a bit of a different perspective but the America that remembers the Alamo ,is polite to women and the elderly and believes in freedom and that a man's word is bond, is worth preserving, 
Logged
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2008, 11:47:22 PM »

An in-depth and open-minded study of our history always reveals the cause to be greed. Some are still fighting the Civil War that didn't have anything to do with slavery until it became clear to Lincoln that he was losing support for his war that was caused by greed. He needed the states that were on the fence to get behind him and slavery provided the way to get it.

The fight for independence of the lands called Texas today is still in the minds of families that lost their lands when the U. S. stepped in.

Once when I was in a military ceremony in South Texas, a group of Mexican American military men hoisted a Mexican flag as a protest against what they had been taught by their forefathers to be a theft of their ancestor's lands. People forget that the Spanish held that land for two centuries before the battle of the Alamo. It turned out that our commanding officer was secretly a Commander in the Brown Berets, a group that, at that time, wanted to see the Mexican lands returned to their rightful owners.

Native Americans wish someone would remember that the land was stolen from them by the Mexicans.
 
Maybe justice will be served when the buffalo reigns again without man around to intervene.   
« Last Edit: February 22, 2008, 11:20:36 PM by radicat » Logged
DanatSavageSmith
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Full Member
***
Posts: 56


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2008, 11:54:38 PM »

I believe that one day there will be peace on Earth...  It will be the day that we are attacked by aliens and we all have to band together to fight them off.  After that we'll probably be at war with the aliens until we are both attacked by some even weirder ones...  They say the only one who wins the war is the arms dealer...  Boy are we in the right line of work!  *kidding, kidding*

-Dan
Logged

Aun Aprendo, Noli non legitime carbor undem est.
www.savagesmith.com
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2008, 12:58:32 AM »

Dan, I know you're kidding, but it brings to my mind the idea that Ed has always taught. Make a knife for a given purpose, or set of purposes, that is the best you can make to meet the goal. Functional performance is more important than all other aspects of a design.

If a knife is to be a true friend that can be relied upon, you must have total confidence in it.
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3503



View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2008, 06:03:41 PM »

The Alamo fell march 6, 1836. The first mention I find of a Bowie Knive is 1840. It seems that the name Bowie knife came into use after the Alamo, before that they were simply called butcher knives.
This little piece of informatioin comes from my last 960 pages of reading about the Alamo, searching for the history of Bowie knives.

Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3503



View Profile WWW
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2008, 10:11:49 AM »

I just received my Greg Martin Auctions Catalog featuring the estate of Donald Littman. Billed as the largest Knife Sale Ever it is a huge collection.

www.gregmartinauctions.com Not only is it a great history lesson, you will have the latest estimated values of  great Bowies, Randalls and much nore, knives from the 1400's up to the 1990's. Take a look, absolute knife lovers delight.

The Auction is Monday. A call if you are interested could maybe secure a copy of the catalog.
Ed
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
caknives
Global Moderator
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 592


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: February 23, 2008, 01:44:44 PM »

Did you see lot #6, its a HUBER ! Cry
Logged

Don't take life to seriously, you'll never make it out alive.  - Van Wilder
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #13 on: February 23, 2008, 03:05:04 PM »

Just incredible, Ed. Thanks. I saw the catalog cover a couple of days ago, but had not gotten back to it.

Tip: click on the the red button at the top "Online Catalog"
Great search capabilities on this site. The virtual catalog is very nice, but a little slower to view, but don't miss it. The eBay Live site is a nice way to view them as well

Below:


(1) Michael Price   Lot # 79

(2) H. Huber         Lot # 6

(3) English & Hubers Lot # 18


* Michael Price DSC00043.JPG (38.04 KB, 640x480 - viewed 1109 times.)
« Last Edit: February 23, 2008, 03:56:55 PM by radicat » Logged
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #14 on: February 23, 2008, 03:12:09 PM »

(2) Huber



* Huber DSC00025.gif (84.54 KB, 600x450 - viewed 1151 times.)
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Up
  Send this topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!