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Author Topic: A High performance Huber  (Read 8067 times)
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Ed Fowler
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« on: December 26, 2007, 08:28:52 PM »

These first photos display a Huber that went to honest work and proved the potential of her sisters. She looks to be in good shape, note no chips out of the blade.












With close up photos we get a few hints to her service to man.













In the above photos you can see evidence that she did not live a life of ease. The hammer dents on her spine were not from a single incident, the patination on some is older than others. Her top clip also knew some tough times.

More photos to follow






Note the knife cut in the ricasso of the blade and in the guard. If this was in fact a knife cut you can bet the man holding the knife shed some blood and maybe left a finger or more at the scene of the drama.














The tip of the blade has some interesting striations that I cannot explain, it may be some tracks that you had to be there to understand.
   

« Last Edit: December 28, 2007, 11:10:34 AM by Ed Fowler » Logged

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caknives
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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2007, 11:23:46 PM »

Beautiful pictures Ed. They were a wonderful welcome back from the world of " broken piece of %$@*" computers. I know this might be a little out there but how deep do you think the tang goes into the handle? All the other known Hubers are pretty much mint right ? What are the chances of a X-ray or something to find out ? Just thinking a short or rat tail tang would have most likely given up under hard use. Do they all have the antler handle ?
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2007, 08:12:53 AM »

Good Question!
Somewhere I have a photo of an x-ray of a Huber tang, taken by Dr Lucie of the Huber he sold to Dr. Stapelton. The tang is rectangular, appears only slightly thinner than the blade and runs about 2/3rds the length of the handle.

The Handle on this Bowie was not loose, which speaks well of the knowledge and command the maker had over the materials that went into this knife.

I only have seen three with antler handles, the later ones got fancy with ivory, and all kinds of stuff to render them show pieces. This one is the only one I have seen that was used hard, she validates the maker and the knife as one of function also.

I have an Aimes Rifleman's knife that was used hard also. The Aimes and Huber were great knives.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2007, 01:19:22 PM by Ed Fowler » Logged

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PhilL
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« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2007, 08:45:00 AM »

Ed, I assume this is the knife we were talking about Tuesday night.
That's a wonderful knife and the pictures are very good, they really tell the history of what the knife has been through.
Thanks for sharing, and thanks Tena.
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« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2007, 11:43:20 AM »

Very nice!
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« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2007, 11:08:15 PM »

That's a spectacular knife in amazingly good condition.

More!
Cheesy
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2007, 11:11:43 AM »

As requested, more photos posted!
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« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2007, 11:56:35 AM »

WOW Ed, more great pictures ! I can see in these that the tang does appear to be quite thick and beefy like you said. Have you considered the guard ? Is it the same as the others ? Original or modified ? It is unlike any I have seen before. The slight swelling at the top and the notches. Just curios.
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« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2007, 12:47:10 PM »

OK, I was looking some more and I think the bend in the top made it look slightly wider or swollen. Probably semetrical in reality. We talk alot about the high performance knife but it is obviously more than just a well concieved and executed blade. A solid comfortable handle that stands the test of time is equaly important. It appears this Huber had one and I know that your handles are mega tough. Have you ever bent a knife with the horn handle on ? I know it would seem a shame after the amount of work that goes into it but it might be very informative. I have done this a few times and it's why I don't use wood any more.  All the wood handles cracked. I know that it's an extreme test but a knife with no handle isn't much of a knife. Just some thoughts.
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« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2007, 03:15:34 PM »

I don't know much, but I do know that the person that did the free-hand grinding of this knife was very skilled at it. To me, the most striking feature is the ridge down the middle of the blade. It is perfectly done, with a slight upturn, that is matched on the other side. That ain't easy to do. And, could only have been the result of making hundreds of previous knives. It may have been done for more than appearance. More flex in the spine?

My guess as to how the marks got on the spine and tip, is that this knife probably removed and hammered back many barbed-wire staples. That was acceptable to do to another man's fence in a crossing of the prairie.

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Bruce Evans
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« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2007, 08:35:36 PM »

Here are a couple pictures of the fancy English and Huber's





As for handle material on the Huber Bowie,I just want to say that they were a company and as such would have used what ever handle material a customer wanted.With such a low number of these known to exist today we may never know just what they used.As to the guard,I would say that it has seen allot of abuse itself and the cutouts on the ends of the guard should have had ball quillions attached.
Bruce
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« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2007, 08:59:14 PM »

As requested, more photos posted!
Ed,
That was fast!
Thank you Cheesy
If that knife could talk...
Bruce, are you saying that the notch in the guard was part of the construction that held the ball quillions/fineals in place?
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« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2007, 08:28:47 AM »

Ebbtide,Yep that is what I was meaning.I had discussed this with Alex and that is what he said it was for.Since we know that this knife has been in collections as long as it was I personally cant think of any other reason for it.If The knife would have seen use during a war I would have said someone modified it and added the holes so they could add a lanyard strap to aid in lashing it to gear or to help hold it when gripping or for lashing it to a pole in a survival situation,if that was the case I would have thought the guard would have the traditional rounded point style double guard (what I call a canoe shaped guard)Then with abuse as it has gotten the thin end may have broke off at the sides of the holes thus leaving the cutouts as we see them.
With as much abuse as this knife has seen The guard could have been bent from hitting it with something or hitting the guard when using it to drive in a nail or stake or something...

Does anyone know if this knife may have seen action in any of the wars before it ended up in a collection?

Bruce
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2007, 09:28:51 AM »

This is a very early Huber, it probably would have been made before the Alamo. Was she in a war?? Maybe, maybe not - the cut in the ricasso and guard indicate she could have been in a fight. The way one of her men bent the guard to make her more compatible to him indicate she was a valuable companion to a man who knew how to use a knife and needed one.

He hammered the spine, possibly driving the edge into what needed cut, the edge held up. He sharpened her and kept the edge in working order, I doubt there was any rust on her when her first few owners shared time with her.

When I look at the art Hubers I am not impressed and would not have any desire to own one. When I saw and held this knife I knew what she was made of and how well she served man. Through her I came to know the Huber was a great knife, made by a premium knife maker who knew what he was doing and made knives to serve man well. To me she validates all Hubers.

Note the lack of a recessed ricasso, the lack of chips out of her cutting edge, the soft back, the dropped handle, the functional guard, this is a what I call a real knife, a champion in the world of knives that we can be proud of.

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Bruce Evans
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« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2007, 08:43:12 PM »

Ed I was thinking more on the lines of it being carried into one of the WW1or WW2 campaigns,you know take Grandpas or Great Grandpas knife to war with you for luck.The guard may have been modified then,or was it in a collection and not used then.

The guard is bent in both directions which to me means someone has hit it and bent it other than just the bends made for comfort.

The fancy handles are allot more comfortable to use than you may think.

Bruce
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