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Author Topic: DANGER:Girls dont know how to hold a knife.  (Read 5424 times)
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Alan
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« on: December 25, 2007, 05:10:46 PM »

It's true,
the fact is that most girls do not know anything about real knives and you run a risk every time you hand them a knife.

Some girls perhaps do know how to hold a knife,(If they grew up with or were taught) but as far as I can see, most girls are equal to a a 6 year old kid when it comes to knowing how to hold a knife without getting cut.

Last night at a Christmas party with the whole clan, I was asked to bring in a knife to pass around to all the guys as we watched the football game.
Everyguy there (some 30 men) correctly knew how to draw the knife from the sheath and how to hold it, and also how to 'carefully" check the edge for sharpness.

However also at times, I noticed that some of the husbands called their wives into the room to look at the blade.
It happend 3 times, and with each wife, NO MATTER the warnings from their husbands, that each girl grabs the knife from the sheath, turns it around and holds onto the knife by the steel, cutting edge aimed at the palm.

3 times in a row!
Oh, and when a girl has the knife held in such a way, dont say or do anything to cause them a fast movement, just suggest that they not do that to the edge.

After it happend the 3rd time, we guys sat around and talked about what was going on?
My idea is that because of dull butter knives in the kitchen the girls didnt understand that a knife can be dangerious...

Another idea was that in today's world, where would a girl learn about a hunting knife?
The hardest cutting jobs in the kitchen anymore are to opening food packages and that is done today with a scissors anyway.    

« Last Edit: December 25, 2007, 05:36:10 PM by Alan » Logged
radicat
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« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2007, 10:25:29 PM »

A lot of women don't feel the need to worry about cutting themselves on a knife because their husband doesn't know how to sharpen one and he doesn't understand that a dull knife is the most dangerous knife of all.
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Alan
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2007, 01:48:37 AM »

<embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/zMTxhUl_DPM" width="425px" height="350px" AllowScriptAccess="never" quality="high" wmode="transparent" /><noembed><object codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=8,0,0,0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://www.youtube.com/v/zMTxhUl_DPM" width="425px" height="350px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/zMTxhUl_DPM" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="never" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer"></object>


working on a sword practice target this Xmas too
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cfendley
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2007, 03:14:00 AM »

I married me a farm girl Grin
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radicat
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2007, 04:46:45 AM »

And, I'd wager that she knows something about knives and knows who to go to for sharpening.

Knowing how to call 911 is also a good thing for a woman to know if there is sword-play on the farm.



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« Last Edit: December 27, 2007, 09:51:24 PM by radicat » Logged
kbaknife
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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2007, 11:29:21 PM »

I'd say those days are gone - for the most part.
It's been a while when the average person knew how to butcher a hog and ready the whole porker for the freezer or the smoke house.
Few times, around the house or kitchen, in today's world is a precise and acurate cutting instrument actually needed anymore.
Kind of sad, now that I think about it.
I'm only 53 1/2, but I had an older sister and brother, and it wasn't until my Mother was pregnant with me that we moved into a house with an indoor toilet.
We lived on a farm in Minnesota and if we needed flour or something, then we went to town.
Other than that, we butchered chickens, hogs, beef, hunted, etc. Made our own cheese, butter, bacon, sausage, canned our vegetables, sweet corn, etc., etc.
You can bet we had sharp tools!! And EVERYBODY in the house knew how to handle one.
There are simply large portions of the past experiences slowly fading into history.
I'm glad I became a knife maker to continue making one of Man's oldest tools.
Makes me proud - sometimes. 
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radicat
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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2007, 01:10:43 AM »

Society in this country is changing. I just chose to not say America, because America, as I knew it, no longer exists. America was about tradition, loyalty, devotion to the betterment of man.

Sure, there are some vestiges of those ideals and a lot of disingenuous talk about them, usually to gain favor, not encourage the practice. But, just as the skills of yesteryear are being lost, traditions are being forgotten too. As a baby-boomer, I grew up in a time when, this country was in transition from one that was made up of communities that had a sense of community. Other than the separation of races, we lived as a unit. No more.

Men in my extended families were hunters. They shared the same skills and experiences. Most had fought in the military. A couple had seen too much killing and were cold and indifferent to death.

Knives were always a part of our traditions. The man had his favorite pocket-knife, could whittle out a toy for a kid, and knew how to take care of it. He had his favorite hunting knife that everyone knew not to touch. Some men in my family had knives that were prizes taken in war that they took out to talk about at every opportunity. The carving set that was stored until the special occasion was prized by both father and mother. There was a case of cutlery that had to be polished for a single use as well. You knew that these same little rituals were taking place in other families.

Things on the farm have changed as well. The large butcher knife that was always wrapped in an oil cloth in the barn would seem a strange thing to most people today. But, they don't understand that just as the ancient priest had the ceremonial knife, the farmer had his knives that deserved respect. That knife may not have had a lofty purpose, but it was special in an odd way. It had helped provide food for the table and the task it performed was a job that had to be done.

Karl, you should be proud of your craft. It represents the traditions of self-reliance and pride in doing fine work. Some people, especially the young, can't understand these traditions, but we should preserve them as long as we can. I was reminded of the changes taking place recently, when I realized that a long-time friends son did not share his understanding of knives. He does know a lot about video games though. 
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DanatSavageSmith
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« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2008, 07:07:55 AM »

My wife knows how to hold a knife, I taught her.  She actually found this skill very useful when a teenage boy attempted to mug her a few years ago:

My wife, Bridget, was walking from her workplace on the Seattle waterfront to her mother's workplace for a late lunch about 2:30 in the afternoon when she was swiftly approached by a young man flipping out a small pocketknife.  The boy demanded her purse while holding the knife out from his body, limp wrist, palm up.  She could tell that he had no idea what he was doing and replied "No." to his demand. 
"But...I have a knife!" he said.
"I don't care!" she replied.
"...Sorry."  he muttered, before throwing the knife in a nearby trash can and loping away.

About two weeks later she met her mom for lunch again and while coming back to her office they stopped at a gas station/carwash.  While her mom was pumping the gas Bridget sat in the car.  The same young man suddenly approached the car and began tapping on Bridget's window.  Hesitantly, my wife opened the window just a crack and said, "What do you want?"
"Your the one," the boy said "You...you saved my life!"
"What?!"  Bridget replied.
"You were the first person I ever tried to mug...  my brother said it was easy."

The last time we were in the neighborhood we stopped at the same gas station, he still works there at the carwash and seems to like his job and be making good money, if his overflowing tip jar is any indicator.

I do love a happy ending.

-Dan
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radicat
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2008, 10:12:44 AM »

That is a happy ending. And, the boy was very fortunate. If he had been successful, his life would probably be over by now.

I know women that carry guns that they will use without hesitation. One saved my life once because she didn't give a damn if the guy had a gun pointed at her and that his friend had his gun on me. She also carries a mean blade to this day, that I gave her. Country girls will not tolerate foolishness.

I have witnessed a steak knife being used to pin a man's hand to a wooden table. He knocked her across the room with his other hand, but he regretted that because it just made her madder. Mistake!!

So, the blanket statement that girls don't know how to use a knife may be true, but finding out that they are really "women" can be a painful event for the guy that lets himself believe it.



 
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DanatSavageSmith
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« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2008, 05:03:42 PM »

Yeah, I've always liked the kind of girl with that secret mean streak.  Strong too.  It's great if a woman looks fantastic in a nice dress, but better if she can carry a pig under each arm for 100 yards too.  Besides, I never trust a stick-thin chef!

-Dan
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caknives
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« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2008, 05:38:35 AM »

Hi Alan,

You don't know me, so let me introduce myself, I am Emma, Chris' fiance.  He made me make sure that I introduced myself, as this is not going to be a polite post.  Granted, there are a few naive, perhaps stupid, women.  Women who have never had to use a knife.  However, making a blanket post about how the gender as a whole doesn't know how to handle a knife is a ridiculous, extremely naive, and rude thing to do. 

But getting past the obvious and nasty, I have several particular issues with your post.  One, I assume that you have no idea about statistics or taking a census, but taking a sample from 3 women that YOU were hanging out with is what some would call, not representative of the population.  In other words, you wrote a post about the actions of THREE women.  Not sure if you have any idea about the population of the United States...but it's a bit more than that.  So you may want to avoid a career in science. 

Two, when you say "when a girl has a knife...don't say or do anything to cause them a fast movement," do you think women are like frightened animals?  We don't spook.  We're not twitchy little creatures that at any moment may accidentally stab ourselves or the person standing next to us.  Give us the benefit of the doubt that maybe we'd at least be CUTTING something and accidentally cut ourselves.  We are familiar with the concept of sharp edges.  I think there was a tutorial in kindergarden or something.

Three, comparing grown women to 6 year-olds is not nearly as accurate as comparing your use of the English language to that of a 6 year-old.  So next time before making rash generalizations about us poor women folk, maybe you could pry one of us out of the kitchen away from our dull butter knives to double check your spelling and grammar. Just a suggestion.

I apologize if this was a bit too harsh.  Just realize that I am judging you based on your one post.  Just as you judged all women based on one experience.  We are not idiots.  Gender differences do exist, I'm not saying they don't.  But it has more to do with lifestyle than presence or absence of a y-chromosome.  Furthermore, and this is my non-hostile, I'm-actually-trying-to-help-you opinion, it is very obvious from your one post that you like to make very harsh judgements and conclusions from VERY little actual information.  If you approach everything in life this way you will never learn anything.   

« Last Edit: February 09, 2008, 02:02:49 AM by caknives » Logged

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Harold Locke
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« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2008, 04:43:07 PM »

Emma,

Thank you for being so articulate. I have wanted for a long to comment to that post but could not get the words out. I sometimes buy alot of good cheap knives and they go mostly to women. In my travels around Southern California I have been amased at the number of women that carry knives on an everyday basis and admit to having their own knife collections.

Bravo Emma,

Harold Locke
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PhilL
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« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2008, 08:21:40 PM »

Welcome Emma, well said.

I learned as much about knives from my Mom as I did from my Dad.
When I was real small my Mom would give me a pretty dull knife and a bar of soap and let me whittle away just to keep me busy. As my dexterity improved she gave me a sharp knife and let me peel the potoatos for dinner. She also taught me that a sharp knife was safer than a dull, knife so she showed me how to sharpen knives. My Dad taught me how to keep a chisel sharp. My Dad was a printer and always had a sharp pocket knife on him.

My wife doesn't carry a knife, but she thought my Linder Stag handle dagge would make the perfect letter opener. My wife is a tough lady, and I believe if she did carry a knife if push came to shove she could open a male just as quick as she'd open the mail. A dirt bag tried to mug my wife on the front stoop of our Manhattan apartment, she got so pissed, she threw himm down a flight of stone steps.

Anyone who underestimates women is making a huge mistake.

Oh, I know a lot more than 3 men that don't know how to handle a knife.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2008, 09:00:52 PM by PhilL » Logged

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DanatSavageSmith
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« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2008, 01:51:55 AM »

I have a fan in Los Angeles who carries and loves knives, I sure wouldn't want to get on the wrong side of her!
Come to think of it, I should invite her to join us here!  Yeah, I'll do that now!  I'd love to hear her opinions on this particular topic!

-Dan
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« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2008, 08:44:19 AM »

Hello All!

I am obviously new here but was invited by Dan to join in the knife fun! :-D  Yes I am that Los Angeles Fan he spoke of above. 

After reading the above replies ... I have to say that I am a bit disappointed.  Granted women who carry knives are not as common as one would think however to base a woman's skill at handling a knife on three examples is very naive.  Sure there are plenty that should not be handling sharp objects however I know of plenty more men that fall under that same category.   

What makes it even more disappointing is that I know there are many men out there that would make the same ignorant comments ... and worse feed such thoughts to the next generation.  Now don't fret I am not going to go off on some "feminist" speech ... I am far from that.  However I am realistic in my thinking ... the world is bigger than three girls.

I am passionate about knives and have my own collection.  I wasn't raised to see them as "boy's toys" and have taught myself how to handle them rather nicely.  In fact ... amongst those that I am close to I am the only person that carries a knive(s) daily ... and this is including both male and female friends.  In my experience it isn't the gender that makes a person unexperienced in knife handling ... it is the personality and amount to time him or her has spent practicing (some knives are harder to handle at first such as the balisongs or waved knives).  And believe me I have witnessed plenty of balisong incidents that were cased by males (that started out by showing off) but I would never make a claim about a male's ability to work a butterfly knife based on the five I saw.

- Vanilla
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