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Author Topic: dvd question  (Read 3029 times)
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brucegodlesky
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« on: December 18, 2007, 11:09:59 AM »

Ed, I just finished watching your dvd again(#1) and in it you say to work the billets side, side and top(spine) never on the blade side. Why? Enquiring minds and all :-) Thanks bruce/birdog    

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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2007, 01:05:37 PM »

Hammer blows only to the sides of the blade and future cutting edge, never to the spine.

The reason is, a hammer blow provides a concentrated force, the force is distributed to a wider area as it travels to the bottom surface. If you wish to experimentally observe this, place a board in sand and hit the top side. You will see the hammer blow where it hits, pick up the board and you will see the force was distributed throughout the bottom surface of the board. If you want to read about it, the dynamics are covered in 'the resolution of component forces' a subject in most physics books.

When Rex does photomicrographs of our experimental blades he can determine the difference between the spine and cutting edge forged in this manner by observing the properties of the steel.

High Endurance Performance blades are not made in one single event, but through careful manipulation of all variables from the first hammer blow to the last.  One little step at a time and when it all comes together the results are amazing.

The theory behind the superiority of forged blades is that forging steel in accord to the nature of the steel enhances potential performance.

Done wrong the forged blade is most likely inferior to a well developed stock reduction blade.

Should you have any additional comments or suggestions they are welcome.
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Alan
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« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2007, 04:21:10 PM »

What I didn't understand, if I'm working with a Ball bearing, or any section of steel thats about an inch or more thick Im going to have to smack every part of the steel with the hammer to work it to shape.

Im not sure how a guy could not hit the spine area just as much as the cutting area.
If you didnt, then the spine would still be shaped like a ball bearing when the blade was finished.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2007, 04:29:17 PM »

When I get my steel from Rex it is usually in 3" x 3" by 14 inch billets. At this time I never hit the future spine with a hammer, I did not need to hit the future spine with a hammer when I was using 3" ball bearings.

Give it a try and see if you can do it.
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Alan
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« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2007, 05:09:51 PM »

well, I dont catch your meaning.
How can steel get thinner unless you force it to get thinner?
 I mean the ball bearing in my case is over an inch thick,,,,down the line at some point the spine has got to get a lot thinner...1/4 inch in my case.

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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2007, 05:51:20 PM »

Alan: I promise you it is possible, just try it!
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Alan
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« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2007, 06:26:39 PM »

I guess i just cant catch your meanings,,,

When i forge a ball bearing I have to heat and bang away on the whole thing to draw it out to the right size.
first i make the round bearing more square as i saw in the bearing to Blade video.  so even right here at the start Im already smacking the stuffing out of the future spine areas.

Then as I get the bearing square I pick a side and start to smack that flat and also turn the blade to draw it out long.
Again Im smacking the square bearing in an even manner so as to keep it going straight.

after a while the billet starts to get long and I decide where the tip will be and what side is up and down....
so by now I have already been beating the stuffing out of the whole bearing spine/middle/tip and all.

Im not sure what a bearing knife would look like if I didnt even try to make it square first?
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2007, 10:59:25 PM »

You can make it square hitting only on three sides. Just mark one side spine on the bar the billet is welded on and don't hit it with a hammer, when you are working on the edge the future spine will be on the anvil.  Just give it a try and you will see how easy it is.
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