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Author Topic: My Primitive Work  (Read 5802 times)
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Tim Lively
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« on: December 13, 2007, 12:26:43 PM »

This is a topic dear to my heart. I guess all my unplugged work would be considered primitive since they were made without the use of electricity. They aren't really reproductions because they aren't copies of old knives. I just try to get the feel of what I like about primitive knives and go from there. The hammer finish thing is more art for me than what old knifemakers did although you do see it on a lot of African made spears. I collect old spears because they give me clues to what is possible with hand tools. Here are some examples of my knives made in a primitive fashion. They are all forged to shape with less than 1% stock removal on the blades. And the stock removal that was done was with files mostly just to true up the profile areas like the shoulder notches where the guard would rest or around the choil area. I recently bought a grinder so Im not unplugged any more but these examples are when I was still working unplugged. I sold the top one for $1250, the second one for $950 and the bottom one I gave to a friend. These were done a few years back. Im more expensive now.




   

« Last Edit: December 13, 2007, 12:50:07 PM by Tim Lively » Logged

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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2007, 12:59:36 PM »

Absolutely beautiful work Tim!
I have only recently become interested in the mid line bevel, you executed them magnificently in these knives, I congratulate you!
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Tim Lively
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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2007, 06:45:36 PM »

Thank you!
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2007, 08:57:46 PM »

Looking at your knives I have a feeling you have done a lot of research into early knives. Would you care to share some of your references and experiences with us?
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radicat
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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2007, 10:51:12 PM »

Ed, I agree. Tim, I hope you don't completely put your unplugged days behind you. Your work is an art that can't be lost. I don't think many makers achieve what you do in getting the most out of a style from the past.

Bruce Evans is another that comes to mind as having the ability to delve into the mind of the old makers and know their methods. That can only be done by someone who has been there and experienced it.

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« Last Edit: January 16, 2008, 10:43:34 PM by radicat » Logged
Tim Lively
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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2008, 11:41:39 AM »

I guess when I started getting serious about knifemaking I was also into the Mountain Man reenactment scene so bowies came naturally with that mindset. Then I saw a book on African art at the University of Arizona's library that showed a lot of hammer finished work on knives and spears so I combined the two. Bowies with hammered finishes. I also got a video of the Himalayan smiths making thier Khukries that really impressed me. They used very simular tooling that I used unplugged.  I really enjoyed working unplugged but I just couldnt make enough money to pay my bills that way because collectors didnt seem to want to pay for the extra work that it took. It just seemed like I was beating a dead horse and it wasnt appreciated when it came down to dollars verses time. I think I learned a lot from that time though so maybe it will bleed over into my new work somehow. I still seek out any information I can find on unplugged knifemaking though. To me, it was just a lot more fun making knives that way but economics won out. Here's a recent video I found on youtube that shows the Himalayan smiths working unplugged.

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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2008, 10:17:46 PM »

WOW ,that middle knife made me gasp. They are all stunning but when I see something like that I get the same feeling an aspiring painter feels when he sees a Monet or a Musician hears Bach. I hope you keep going with the hammered finishes and with what expresses you rather than just what the market thinks it wants. The best thing I have taken away from this site is the idea that instead of copying what is popular I should find what is worthwhile and unique in my work ad try to bring it out. You have definitly captured that.
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Tim Lively
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2008, 10:04:24 AM »

Thanks! No, I wont ever completely give up on the unplugged thing. Somehow it's comforting to think I could still make knives if I wind up homeless living in the woods mumbling to myself.  Smiley
I like the idea of working in series of styles. Find something that holds my interests in knives and run with it for a few years. That was my unplugged hammer finish series and now Im ready for a new series of style. Next, I want to explore creating very active hamons on blades with cool jihadas and combine that with more intricate silversmithing for the fittings. That ought to keep me busy for at least a few years or so.
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Carey Quinn
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2008, 02:17:04 PM »

Tim,

I really look forward to seeing what you come up with.

Carey
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