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Author Topic: Ecthing  (Read 3319 times)
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K Salonek
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« on: November 19, 2007, 12:47:44 PM »

When I first seen the etching processes in Ed's DVD, and read about it in the books. I ran the tires off my rig chasing Radio Shack  for Ferric Chloride,,,, a trip well payed for! I now have as many questions as answers.

This picture is of 3 blades, 52100 forged, but not all from the same sized starting stock. Just so happens that there all cutters, but the Perch-Belly blade (in the middle) will out cut the others by a noticeable margin,,,,, many more normalizing heats by my notes, but I think there is a chance, by mistake, that it is one of my first to gain extremely small grain structure?.



Just hoping to share thoughts?.    

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K Salonek
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2007, 12:54:06 PM »

More etching pictures, this one possibly out-cuts anything I ever held, triple tempered at 390Deg. F 'true temp' a little harder to sharpen then others, but can not get the edge to chip, this one will whittle brass and 6061 T6 aluminum. My question here, I can re-etch it any number of times, and will only come up two-toned,,,,,, did I nail it? Or a fluk?



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K Salonek
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2007, 01:11:35 PM »

Off today, can you tell? Tell me if I am posting to much or asking to many questions?

These are from the same batch at the above knife with the funny handle.

I placed these in the order that I think they will perform,,,, all the same HT as above, but if there is a constancy to my notes, thats how they will score. What stories do these tell or what have others seen?

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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2007, 03:10:19 PM »

K: An etch most generally confirms what you did, if you missed completely it will reveal your error dramatically.

Reading etches with out all the antecedent information (including stuff that you would never believe makes a difference) becomes a little more complex.

What I see in the first three blades you photographed the one in the middle shows a complex transition zone from soft to hard. My experience has been that this is a good thing. I can pretty much bet that if we were to break the blade we would find a pyramid of martensite pointing to the spine. The nature of the transition zone is very dynamic to me at this time.

My suggestion: test for edge flex, test for cut and then etch and carefully observe what you see, put the informaton gained together and you will be on the road to learning your blades.

I do see nice honest quench lines in your blades and congradulate you for your desire and enthusiams to know.

I have been reading my etched blades for over 25 years and continue to learn. I have another experimental blade in the mill and hope my initial goal will show up. I started the blade over 3 months ago. Some times etches make you cheer, sometimes you cry and sometimes you wonder. I am sorry that I cannot provide absolute answeres to your questions, I do know the answers will wait for you to find them, providing you keep asking.
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caknives
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« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2007, 06:52:54 PM »

Nice blades ! I was curious what grit you sand to ? This would help you tell the grain size. At about 600 I am usually able to tell what I have going on.  1200 should be plenty.I like the scagel style treatment of some of your guards. I've been meaning to try that and I think you have given me the push I needed.
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K Salonek
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« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2007, 10:45:56 PM »

Thank You Ed!

I am good with  having a start.

Another gift etching gives me is how and were to set the depth of the heated part of the blade that gets to critical. If I may explain that better?

I seems t0 error on the side of safety, I tend to pull the color higher then I need, making a closer to fully hardened blade. Taking notes, it seems that the blade hardens right were the torch/color and magnet  said it would.

This gift will eventually build a confadance , the line fallows the torch/color/critical-temp.  to a 'tee' . Having the etch back up that 'feel' is just fantastic!

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K Salonek
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2007, 10:59:38 PM »

Nice blades ! I was curious what grit you sand to ? This would help you tell the grain size. At about 600 I am usually able to tell what I have going on.  1200 should be plenty.I like the scagel style treatment of some of your guards. I've been meaning to try that and I think you have given me the push I needed.

Thanks CA



The 4 blades pictured are ground to an 80 grit before HT , the top one of the 4 was retouched with a dull #80 grit belt before etching.

The knife in the first picture is sanded to a @600 grit for the etch, but had some time on the buffer,,,,, it still needs a little more clock.
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2007, 09:31:49 AM »

Before hardening my blades I always grind then down to at least a 220 grit belt and lately a little finer. I find that any scratches larger than those produced by a 220 grit belt can leave a track in the blade below the depth of the origonal scratch, thus producing a potential stress raiser!

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davidm
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« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2007, 10:41:01 AM »

K Salonek,
Thanks for posting. I enjoyed seeing your photos and like your designs. 
Are the top three handled in walnut?
David   
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K Salonek
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2007, 11:11:32 AM »

Your Welcome David, fun stuff, no!

The top 3 are handled in Mountain Scrub Oak , there sure is enough of that around here, and a very hard oak. At 150 years old (or so) thay die at maybe 12 - 15 feet tall cause of the wind-swept hills.

There is a point after they die, just before dry rot but still hard , that they take on a very nice color, takes some cuts to find a good one, but well worth it. (Pic bellow)

The darker wood on the other blade is a $5 Marlin (a was foot tall flea market find of a Desert Iron Wood carving of a fish)

« Last Edit: December 18, 2007, 11:13:49 AM by K Salonek » Logged

Ed Fowler
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« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2007, 01:09:36 PM »

I love the scrub oak and the fact that it comes from your community and especially the fact that you are knowledgable about trees themselves. The greater the command a maker has over the materials he uses the more they are a true part of him. I tip my hat to you and your knives.
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