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Author Topic: Shop Tips  (Read 31386 times)
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Ed Fowler
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« on: August 31, 2007, 10:01:34 AM »

Soon this will be another major heading. This will be a place for us to post any shop tips we come across that make our job a little easier, better or more cost effective.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2007, 11:02:42 PM »

Good thoughts Matt: All of them right on the money!
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« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2007, 10:33:12 PM »

Hi guys ,I am very new to knifemaking so I have to get by with improvised equipment.
I have found that damaged belts make great little quarter dollar sized sanding disks for use with a dremel.
I use them for hundreds of things especially the 80 grit ones.

I have no band saw to cut out steel blanks so I use a 20$ angle grinder with a cut off wheel.
It works great for straight cuts but not well for inside curves.

I will definitly try some beeswax.
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radicat
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« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2007, 02:09:55 AM »

http://www.iwillknot.com

Just as a man can't go through life without knowing how to use a knife, he can't go without using knots to tie line (rope to land-lubbers) . You tie your shoes with a square-knot (reef-knot) and you have to secure a load, such as hauling your hammer to the shop.  Find a small piece of rope to practice while watching TV or a movie.

If you learn only one knot, learn the bowline knot. It will tie (bend) different size lines together, won't slip as long as a load is on it, and is easy to un-tie. I have tied it thousands of times. I learned to tie it in the dark, and with one hand, and have staked my life on it many times, by adding half-hitches at the tail. It is the perfect knot to use for a tow-line with a large loop, so that the knot is not under the vehicle, and you can determine the length of the line easily. Knowing how to use line around the shop just adds to the fun. .
« Last Edit: October 23, 2007, 10:05:47 AM by radicat » Logged
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« Reply #19 on: November 09, 2007, 10:27:22 PM »

This is a great shop tip that came up during a discussion on testing tips started by member K Salonek.

It's a clamping device that provides that third hand you always wish you had at the anvil.

For more info search "Tip Test"                    Thanks, K Salonek


* clampB33perD.gif (38.19 KB, 250x187 - viewed 341 times.)
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« Reply #20 on: November 12, 2007, 12:06:40 AM »

Unsub was telling about using the heat treat services of Ranger Original in Alberta, so I went to check them out. Nice site of Rob and Marilyn Ridley, both knifemakers. I got a kick out of his "Knife Making Truisms" and he has some good safety tips too.  Their supply store is stuff they use themselves.  Thanks Unsub

http://www.rangeroriginal.com
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« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2007, 06:45:29 AM »

after reading the trueisims ....my thoughts.....super glue for cuts saves on stiches.......
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2007, 10:26:16 AM »

One thing I learned the hard was is that all super glues are not the same. When using super glue to patch a cut I first dip into or pour rubbing alcohol over the cut, this lessens the chance of trapping bacteria in the cut. Then I apply pressure to the cut with a paper towel soaked with alcohol to press the blood away from the cut, then super glue. I use Duro - Superglue, a product of Locktite corp.

Once years ago I use another product and immediately the surrounding tissue started to redden and soon I had a raging infection (or allergic reaction) surrounding the wound. My soulution was to open the wound up again, soak in alcohol and use the Duro super glue, the reversed the spreading reaction or infection and healing began. This worked, but if things had not immediately started getting better it would have been time to see my Doc.
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Alan
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« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2008, 11:12:10 AM »

Shop things I have learned.

use a leaf blower to clean the shop

position the beltgrinder contact wheel so that it hangs over the end of the workbench and has nothing close under it.

Drill and connect the chuck key of the drillpress to a retracting key ring.  Position this key ring to the top of the drill press.

always put a mirror finish on brass when fileing a tang slot in it.

Every knife gets a new 36 grit belt.

dump windshield washer fluid into the quench water to keep it from freezing

never turn you back on the forge , always keep an eye on it.

The best thing to add to your shop is light.

use hockey tape on the handles of the forge hammers to provide grip.





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K Salonek
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« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2008, 11:59:23 AM »

I like the Hockey tape idea on hammers!

If I may add, scraping hammer-handles with a broken glass and searing the wood (just enough to darken or char the color) with the forge-flames will provide a good blister-free hold in extremely hot weather and help grip with sweaty hands.
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caknives
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« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2008, 04:33:09 PM »

I sand my handles too. Tried grip tape once, gave me blisters. But for the record, I was blacksmithing about 10 hours a day. A few hours at a time might not do this.
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Alan
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« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2008, 05:40:38 PM »

The tape helps me for 2 reasons.  The tape helps hang onto the handle when your hands get wet with sweat.
And the tape helps hang onto the handle when I have on the winter gloves.
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kbaknife
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« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2008, 06:07:50 PM »

A couple of shop items that save me LOTS of time and simply make my day go easier and more enjoyable.
I do a lot of filing on my knives, especially guards, handles and clips.
that's about everything, right?
Anyway, I got tired of wondering waht file was what and not being able to determine one from another while in a container, plus, when you have them together, they're just banging into one another and getting dull!!
So, I took a square from an overhead light diffuser and made a rack! Now, I can instantly select the file I want at ease, and they always stay sharp!
 

Then, ever notice how when you have something in the vise you only have access to 180 degrees of it? Even if you spin the vise, then it's over the bench, you keep running into the bench, then you start cussin', etc.
So, I made a vise stand out of a 4 inch combine axle. welded a 3/8" thick top and bottom, as well as stabilizing webs.
Now, when I have something in the vises, I can walk all the way around it and have full 360 access to my work piece.

 

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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2008, 10:25:14 PM »

Good Practical ideas and nice job puttng them together. I am always amazed at how many improvements we can develop to make our jobs easier.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2008, 09:19:53 AM »

THE BIG WRECK:
Waiting for all of us at some time is the big wreck, Karl and Clay mentioned some good examples. I think about them a lot and seek to avoid the potential severity of what can happen. Having a plan and practicing to make it work is simply practical survival.

Years ago a neighbor lost his leg between his ankle and his knee in an auger. He simply sat back and bled to death. No one knows when he lost consciousness, from blood loss or shock?

I do my very best to plan ahead, when buffing blades I imagine a blade slicing into my arm or leg, as vividly as possible I roll play what needs to be done.

Hanging on the wall in several places in the shop are rolls of plastic electrical tape with a long end hanging down for easy and quick start of my shop tourniquet. I say to my self NOW, and imagine the wreck either to one of my arms or legs - then go to the roll of tape. I play the game for real, using my good hand (either right to left) - practice with both, I grab the tape, then start wrapping the tape between the wound and my heart, pulling each wrap tight until the imaginary blood quits spurting. 

I have three remote and one old dial phone in my shop placed in handy locations. Then I go to a phone and dial 91- using a pencil in my mouth or either hand (practice with both). I do this without looking at the dial or buttons. Our greatest effort should be toward prevention, but roll playing is the best way to prepare for the worst.

The more vividly you can imagine the wreck the greater the potential value of you roll playing. First I imagine the wreck, back away from the buffer, grinder, band saw - then follow my thoughts about what would be, I swear loudly - most of the time there would be no one to hear but just maybe - then I proceed with my doctoring.

I used to have some tourniquets laying around, but the soon got buried or lost their ability to tighten, most required two hands to operate. The tape is something we naturally use often and more familiar to us through regular use.
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« Reply #30 on: January 16, 2008, 12:17:31 PM »

Ed that is great that you practice what you would do in an emergency.
There is a saying we have that when the sh-t hits the fan, you will not rise to the occasion, you will default to the level of your training. Role playing is great and mental maneuvering is almost as good.
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