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Author Topic: Shop Tips  (Read 39479 times)
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Ed Fowler
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« on: August 31, 2007, 10:01:34 AM »

Soon this will be another major heading. This will be a place for us to post any shop tips we come across that make our job a little easier, better or more cost effective.    

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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2007, 10:04:51 AM »

While working with Harlan at Little Giant, he asked me to cut a piece of steel. He handed me a hacksaw that had a blade that looked completely shot, it would not cut! I asked him if he had a new blade, he smiled and said here try this.

He picked up a piece of bees wax off of his work bench and smeared some of the wax on the blade. It cut like a new one!! It not only cut very well, it cut with less effort than a new blade would have.

Give it a try, it really works well!
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Arno
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« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2007, 10:49:45 AM »

Great topic Ed!
I?ve also found a related use to bees wax: when drilling or machining that terrible 304 stainless, a quick rubbing of that wax on the drill or mill reduces the heat and enhances their cutting ability.

Salut

Arno
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radicat
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« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2007, 10:14:01 PM »

Good idea for a thread. The honeycomb we see in a jar of honey is the natural bees wax made by the bees
that is attached to a thin sheet of paraffin based material that is inserted in the frames of a bee hive to give the bees a starting point and to control how they build in a nice layer that is easy to harvest.
 
Pure bees wax is an excellent lubricant and sealant used in many products. It is also mixed with resins to make an adhesive for musical instruments.

Paraffin has properties that make it an especially good absorber of heat. It is used in many industrial machining processes.  Crayolas are mostly paraffin based.

Carpenters of old always kept a ball of bees wax handy to lubricate their saws and plane faces.

A web-site for purchasing inexpensive small and large quantities of pure bees wax :

http://www.survivalschool.com/products/fire_starting/Bow_Drill_Kit.htm

Thanks for tolerating a trivia nut.             Clay

« Last Edit: October 04, 2007, 10:26:02 PM by radicat » Logged
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2007, 12:18:47 PM »

This is an article about the Baldor buffer and the set-up.

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Luthier/Technique/Finish/Buffer/buffer.html
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ironcrossforge
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« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2007, 04:53:45 AM »

what kind of glue do you all use ....seems that the 2 part stuff that sets in 5 min has its short comings...im looking for something better
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2007, 07:15:55 AM »

For my sheephorn: when sticking it on the blade I like Bob Brownells acra glass. It starts to set up in an hour, but requires 24 for full strength. I like it because it has time to penetrate into the sheephorn for a strong bond. I always clean the steel with some spray grease remover and rough it up with a 60 grit belt to assure a good contace.

For sticking my spacers together and minor horn repairs I use Zap - A -Gap CA+ made by Pacer Technology. It is a thick superglue that sets up quick and penetrates well.

When I get a cut in my skin I use Lock Tite super glue. First I soak the wound with rubbing alcohol, then glue it together. If needed a clean strip of cloth can be added for a 'butterfly' arrangement.

Another first aid treatment that I dearly love is Colegate toothpaste on burns. It proviced immediate pain relief and healing is quick.
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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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radicat
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« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2007, 11:14:01 AM »

Zap-A-Gap Plus is a product sold under the Superglue owned line of Pacer products.

Here is what it is:      http://www.ca-plus.com/faq.html
quote from that site: Some cyanoacrylates are used in place of sutures and the cured adhesive usually falls off in a matter of days

Here is one place where it can be purchased in various types, as well as a spray kicker to dry it faster if needed:

http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/paa/paapt05.htm
« Last Edit: September 23, 2007, 11:41:34 AM by radicat » Logged
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« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2007, 12:00:09 PM »

I edited the glue references above a couple of times because I kept finding better info. It is amazing how much variety there is in adhesives.
 
Believe it or not, I coined the name Super Glue about 35 years ago. I told a Dow Corning salesman that I called their glue "Super Glue". He sold the company on the name and they started putting it on their products. Later they had to drop the name because someone else got a copyright on it. At that time, I was in the motorcycle business. But, that is another long story. I got a million of them.    Clay
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2007, 07:45:01 PM »

Today I tried applying beeswax to 36 grit 2 x 27 Paco Belts. The belts cut with less drag, thus less wear on my back, they seemed to cut longer and I found no harm is using it. The smell was also kind of nice.
I encourage othes to give it a try and report back.
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radicat
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« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2007, 10:31:20 PM »

That's a good tip, Ed. Thanks. Less drag and less fatigue on the hands should mean less chance to get hurt.
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Vance Perkins
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« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2007, 06:23:26 PM »

This may not be right place to ask this.......Ed what kind of grinder do you use?  KMG, Bader or .....?
Thanks
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2007, 08:31:19 PM »

My favorite belt grinder is the Burr King 960. I have one with the 8 inch drive wheel. (after 25 years it now measures 7 3/4 inches in diameter, wore off 1/4 inch) I run it straight with my Iiams platten and love it dearly. It is on its 3rd motor. 1700 rpm, 1 horse.

The center of the drive wheel is about 2 inches above my belly button. This is the height that produces the least stress on my back, allows me to lock in to my sides well with my forarms.

I use the platten for leveling blades, all the rest of my grinding is done on the wheel or slack belt between the platten and wheel.

Next is another 960 variable speed with the knife makers attachment. I take the platten out for fine grit and buffng finishes. I got very luck, picked it up at a garage sale for $75.00.

I also have a Bader with a 3 inch and one inch grinding radius surfaces. Works great for handles!

In my experience the folks from Bader are the nicest guys in the industry. When I had to deal with Burr King it was a hassel. Now I deal with True Grit or Texas Knife Makers, good folks!

One note about safety, when a belt has a tear or crease in it, cut it in half and use it like sand paper with your hands. Bad belts are a wreck waiting to happen.
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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2007, 04:41:27 PM »

When Ed mentioned not using belts with tears or creases in them, it brought back something I grew up watching my father do with his vehicles, shop equipment etc.  Look, Listen and Feel.

This may seem like day one stuff to some of us, but to those who are newer to the shop or specific pieces of equipment, this can save you some grief.  A visual inspection of your equipment can reveal a lot of pretty obvious things and also some not so obvious things, like a hairline crack, a set screw that is backing out slowly, or just some gunk building up on a surface where you don't want it. 
Listening can tell you if you have a chunk missing out of your belt... while it's running. When I hear that sound, I immediately stop and inspect the belt, I've never been wrong with that sound.  Any odd sounds made by your equipment are worth looking at right away.
Feeling...well, that comes with some practice and experience on your equipment.  I can usually tell when to back off a drill bit, or tell when something isn't quite going the way it should be, buy the way it "feels" sometimes. 
We all look, listen, and feel lots of stuff every day, but how many of us pay that much attention to it?  It may save us some broken tools or a trip to the ER.  My guess is, most people that are reading this know this already, but I thought it may be handy for some of the guys just starting out. -Matt-
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ironcrossforge
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« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2007, 09:25:08 PM »

any tips on welding stainless and 5160 into a billit?
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