Knife Talk Online Forums
  Home membership Help Search Calendar Members Classifieds Treasury Store Links Gallery Media Center Login Register  
Custom Search
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Send this topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: test  (Read 5143 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« on: December 29, 2006, 09:29:46 PM »

test message, I will clear later    



* 3bbk.JPG (77.86 KB, 1275x1650 - viewed 270 times.)

* buff.JPG (67.78 KB, 1120x1629 - viewed 259 times.)
« Last Edit: December 29, 2006, 11:31:39 PM by Alan » Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2006, 09:46:32 PM »

Im learning how to post a photo...


* etch1.JPG (66.19 KB, 1254x1544 - viewed 265 times.)
Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2006, 11:25:37 PM »

buffed and ready to get guard


* buff.JPG (67.78 KB, 1120x1629 - viewed 259 times.)
« Last Edit: December 30, 2006, 05:20:04 AM by Alan » Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2006, 11:34:12 PM »

test, Im learning how to post, I will clear this topic when I have learned a few more things...


* buff.JPG (67.78 KB, 1120x1629 - viewed 248 times.)

* buff.JPG (67.78 KB, 1120x1629 - viewed 251 times.)
« Last Edit: December 29, 2006, 11:37:17 PM by Alan » Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2006, 01:23:02 AM »

got to finish the guard tonight...


* file.JPG (63.23 KB, 1629x891 - viewed 260 times.)
Logged
RAN
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
***
Posts: 18


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2006, 02:22:14 AM »

lookin good!
Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2006, 03:00:22 AM »

I like no line at all in the joint...I solder from the top and rub a brass rod across the fresh hot solder,,,then buff...


* kkkk.JPG (87.86 KB, 1629x1254 - viewed 254 times.)
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3448



View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2006, 05:17:40 AM »

You are doing very well my friend. I have yet to try to post a photo anywhere!
Your blade looks good, much better than my first 50 knives!
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2006, 05:32:20 AM »

Im posting some scans...they are not really photos.
I just lay the knife on top of the scanner/copier thats sitting right next to me here,
Just takes a second, so thats fun, but I wont get the quality.

My hope is that I can post a photo and have you guys tell me your thoughts of how to do the next step...then I do it and post a shot of  how it went....

I forged this knife with my wife about 2 days ago. last night i did the heat-treatments...
I sanded it down to the final form, I etched it..then buffed it .

I drilled the brass guard...messed it up, ended up with a slot that was not lined up with the rest of the guard, so I had to file the slot more off to one side.

That opened up a HUGE gap , thus I had to solder a huge wad into positioon to fill the gap.  Then I sanded with wet/dry  sandpaper and then buffed....

Looks cool to me!

THE PROBLEM.....
The curve of the knife is all wrong...
I dont like the cutting area and it's curves at all,,It ended up not like the Pronghorn I was attempting to copy at all...


* ready2.JPG (88.61 KB, 1254x1629 - viewed 260 times.)
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3448



View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2006, 04:07:58 PM »

My suggestion, use that blade, cut with it or whatever you want it to do. That blade shape will do some things very well, other cuts will require you to work with the geometry.

All blade shapes have some useful aspects and some that are not what you like. Every blade shape is a compromise, you can learn from all of them.

I would call that blade shape a skinner, it should do that task well. It has enough point to get into your work, but not quite as effeciently as one with more point. I made a blade like that one years ago for a trapper who likes it very much, instead of carrying beaver back to his pickup, he skins then on location and just carries the hides. He is over 90 years old and still traps every day when fur is prime.

This is one aspect of knife making I will emphasize over and over again. Get to know your knives well, try them at various tasks and enjoy sharing time with them. Some will call a blade by various aspects of function, and have never used one, have no idea what the blade shape is for. All their learning came from reading some other individuals thoughts, it gets repeated over and over and soon that blade shape has a functioin.

The human hand and mind are very adaptable, they can find a use for any tool, uses that the man who designed it never dreamed of.

The only way to become a knife maker of knives dedicated to function is through testing your knives. Some rely on theory to explain function, the more they rely on theory the bigger the words they use. When man comes to understand an issue he is able to communicate with words a child can understand.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2006, 06:08:02 PM by Ed Fowler » Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2006, 06:20:41 PM »

Ed, I know by now that after so many blades you have finished, that you have it in your mind what you want the blade curves to look like.  But I still dont really have any idea what the thing will look like until I am almost finished with it.

That one blade you made that I talked abut the other day, thats the one blade I always have in my mind when I start a knife.  I just never got there yet.

BUT NOW;
That I have learned enough to post a photo, I now seek some advice on my next blade (#4 ball bearing blade), with this #3 as a guide.
I have a few questions about this blade, a few problems I would like your advice about.
I have placed arrows at the spots that concern me.

Notice the arrow above the brass guard:
Notice the angle the guard sits as compared to the blade lines.
I tilt the guard in this manner after i once ended up with a guard that seemed tilted to the back.  I just want to make sure that there is a foward flow to the guard, but right now, as I look at this knife and the way the guard sits on it, Im not sure it look very good.

Notice the arrow along the spine:
Im never sure what the curve along the spine sould be like. 
More rounded next time?
less rounded"
Im also never sure I drop the point enough at the tip?
As i look at this knife I think now that I should have dropped the tip more.

Notice the arrow along the cutting point of blade.
I just missed the mark here.
I didnt get even close to the shape of the cutting point of the blade I wanted.
It just now seems too long, to far away from the fingers.

Notice the arrow at the curved belly of the blade.
it seems to me to drop down too much.
The curve does not flow well back to the racasso too.
I tried two times to grind the curve to more flow into the ricasso but after I sharpened the blade it still ended up looking a bit blocky to me...

   


* arrow4.JPG (87.17 KB, 1254x1629 - viewed 262 times.)
Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2006, 10:30:43 PM »

fitting the Micarta block to become the handle



* fitinghandle.JPG (95.46 KB, 1629x1254 - viewed 251 times.)
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3448



View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2006, 02:37:05 AM »

The angle of the guard is a personal choice, where do you want the hand when using the blade for your chosen function. I usually make this decision when I decide on the length of the ricasso, then set the angle of the guard in relation to the plunge grind in front of the ricasso, if that is what I feel is complimentary. I have tiped guards back and forward and had them at a 90 degree angle to the spine. It is all up to you, what do you like?

The spine of the blade is round enough that when you grip the knife tight and rub your thumb back and forth on the spine you do not feel any sharp edges on the spine. I simply round the spine until it feels comfortable.

When it comes to blending the cutting edge to the ricasso, I make this decision when forging, then grind the edge and ricasso the way I want the finished realtionship to be. That blade has a very deep belly, and the ricasso looks parallel to the spine. The ricasso does not have to be parallel to the spine, but in line with the cutting edge. Again yours is no huge error, just keep working until you achieve what you like to see.

I like the tip to drop a little because an upswept tip is tough on scabbards, the tip always bites into the leather. You can work around it in the way you put the blade into the scabbard, but I like to keep it simple and the droped tip is what I am used to.

When we make putting the blade back into the scabbard almost as easy as laying the blade down and tell our selves, never, never, never lay a knife down in the field we will be less apt to lose the knife. There are only two places a knife should be, in your hand or in the scabbard.

Don't let that knife get away from you until you have used it enough to know its good aspects as well as those that do not work too well. WE can learn from every knife we make if we make it happen.

You are progressing very well, all you have to do is keep after it.

I hope I answered your questions, if not ask again.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2006, 07:39:20 PM »

I bonded the handle last night, and this morning I just started to sand down the Micarta ...


* sandhandle1.JPG (87.63 KB, 1629x1254 - viewed 254 times.)
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3448



View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2007, 12:52:21 AM »

Allen: I am also working on handles at this time gettng ready for a show in Los Vegas. As IU wather you work, I put my brain to work while shaping handles trying to remember all the little tricks I have learned.

One thing th keep in mind is that while using a knife the hand will move around the handle constantly. In order to make the handle friendly the shape must compliment the hand that is using it.
The hand moves back and forth along the handle. To make the handle friendly, you need to keep your sanding and fileing along these lines. My tendeancy was to work the handle at right angles, my handles became more friendly when I started working more in line with the knife, fore and aft rather than right and left.

Keep this in mind, constantly pick up the knife and work your hand around the handle roll it , turn it upside down, shift your grip and listen to what your hand tells you.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Send this topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!