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Author Topic: My suggestions  (Read 37694 times)
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Alan
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« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2010, 05:37:11 AM »

"#1 - Do not turn the camera sideways....never ever do this as it makes people at home sick."

still so true...

Over the last few years I have watched a ton of YouTube videos on knife making, on sword making, and within the last month on Pow wow drum making.
One of the most basic and common errors i see is when to film something that is tall the person holding the video camera will turn the camer on its side to get the whole image in the shot.

What an error!

The result can make the viewer at home a bit car sick to watch, and will likely get people to judge the whole video effort as something not worth the time to watch.
I think what is going on is that while the person in front of the camera might be an expert in his or her craft, the person asked to shoot the video  showing the expert working on something has little or no training, and has likely not even held the camera that are asked to use.

For anyone who is even thinking of making a video that will be sold to others the best advice I could ever give you is to HIRE SOMEONE WHO KNOWS WHAT THEY ARE DOING!
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2010, 07:46:13 PM »

Alan: If you ever come to the Willow Bow, Tena, the camera lady and cook, would love to cook you a nice dinner you would never forget.
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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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Alan
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« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2010, 04:01:02 AM »

I was searching on Youtube on how to make a basket, and found a video made by one of the best basket makers in the country.
The guy was clearly a master at his craft, and likly had books out on the topic.

Yet posted on YouTube  is the video he had out (a video he clearly sells on-line) where it seems that he left the job of camera crew to his wife, or his girl friend....or someone's wife or girlfriend.

The video was nuts.
I re-read my list of rules at the start of this topic and they seem to have broken nearly every one.

The camera person had no clue what the guy was going to do next so we constyantly heard the guy telling the camera girl, "Over here"...."over here"..."Over here"

At times the camera zoomed in, for a tight shot, only to get left behind when the action moved slightly to the side....
Other times the camera shot was totally missing the action as the camera girl must have been so interested in what the guy was doing she look around the camera to watch with her eyes while the camera shot the table and some shadows.

Now Im sure this basket maker wanted to sell a great video of how to make a basket.
And Im sure he had a coin or two to rub together as he planned the video.
So why did he ask someone who is not trained in shooting professional videos to have the most important job of doing it for him?..... God only knows but I hope he learned a lesson.
Its not the video shooters fault after all.  Im sure she is a great wife.
Perhaps the problem is just human nature.
perhaps when a person works hard to become an expert in his field he also gets the idea that any video oh him working in his craft will also be great?
I dont know...

But what I do know after watching tons and tons of videos over the years is that there are some clear ways to make them better, and there are clear mistakes that normal people make when just handed a video camera.
They shake, they over use the zoom, they dont know where the action is going, and they turn the camera on its side...
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2010, 09:13:10 PM »

The only "professional" photographer we have for videos wants $100 and hour to work. That is way beyond our budget.

The purpose of the DVD was not to entertain, but to share information and when you look at some of the knives folks have made from watching the DVD I feel we did a good job.
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Alan
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« Reply #19 on: September 14, 2010, 04:24:04 AM »

Im no expert, but I have watched more than my share of videos and movies.
from this I believe there are 3 areas that should be the chief concern for anyone planning on making a future video for themselves to be sold.

#1 - what you are going to point the camera at.
#2 - How you are going to light it.
#3 - how you are going to record the sound.

To address these concerns what I have learned is that you are always far better off asking for help if you are new to making a video.
Too many cell phone camera videos have tricked us into believing "Anyone can do this"
But the truth is ,is that producing a video that you intend to offer for sale or as a teaching video needs careful planning.
You cant just turn the camera on and start shooting and expect to have something later that is worth watching.
"Preparation" is key...

Go over what you want to show , and what you want the camera aimed at before you start, so that later no one needs to be asking the camera person, "Over here"


The way lighting is in a video will help the final result be far more interesting to watch.
There is something to be said for the old standard way most people light objects to be photographed.  (3 POINTS OF LIGHT)
The use of a reflected front light, an side light to fill in and get rid of shadows, and a background light to add depth, still is a good way to light a video.

I have seen far too many videos where it looks like the person has just turned his shop lights into his face to light the video, or taken the shades off of grandma's lamps...LOL
The result is a guy squinting into a harsh light that casts shadows and washes out the skin.

Correct sound makes a video great, bad sound makes it a waist of time.
I believe in the use of a clip on mic when a person is walking around working on stuff.
the clip on mic also makes it easy to hear a voice over the noise of a running motor.

I was watching a video on car repair and the guy turned on the engine and then started screaming over the din at the camera half way across the room!
What a joke!
Had the person in that video just used a clip on mic he could have spoken in a normal voice.

A Clip on mic tend to make the noise of a running motor moot.

I also believe that in any video where a motor is running and the person in the video wants to say something that he should use a "voice over" that he records later.
This way the noise of the motor is totally taken out of the video, and the person can speak in a normal voice.

Other ideas:
Never use a "zoom"....put tape over that button to keep yourself from being tempted to use it.

Use written notes,,,cue cards when you talk to someone.
Dont just turn on the camera and try to have a normal conversation....
Plan where the conversation is going...
know what points each of you plan to make.
Place the cue cards behind the person (off screen) so that you always appear to be looking at the other person.
When you are talking to someone always look at them when they are speaking.

Never do anything while someone is speaking, or some important action is going on.

Never turn the camera on its side to film tall things.

Pen the dogs!








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Alan
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« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2010, 03:47:14 PM »

For a good example of how important it is to get the sound of a video right, here is a video that at the time I write this has over one million hits.
<object codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=8,0,0,0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://www.youtube.com/v/FUJ7uQ2qwxk" width="425px" height="350px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/FUJ7uQ2qwxk" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="never" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer"></object> (External Embedding Disabled)

Notice in that video how it is basically a camera locked down and only showing a girls face....one million hits for a video of a face?
The reason this video is so popular is the use of sound.   
To see this important and how it truly makes a video "pop", just turn the sound of your computer off and try to watch it......

You cant.
Its too dull to watch without the sound.

The sound is not just the nice music, but mostly the voice-over narration that make this video worth one million views..
The voice-over narration makes the video appear more instructive, and more professional that just talking to the camera live would be.

Imagine how a similar voice-over narration might help a Bladesmith's video as he works on a new blade on  a power hammer?


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Alan
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« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2010, 01:06:30 PM »

I have been searching for some videos that talk about the things I have brought up here.
<embed type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/LFM8bHuYmhg" width="425px" height="350px" AllowScriptAccess="never" quality="high" wmode="transparent" /><noembed><object codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=8,0,0,0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://www.youtube.com/v/LFM8bHuYmhg" width="425px" height="350px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/LFM8bHuYmhg" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="never" /><param name="pluginspage" value="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer"></object>
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