Knife Talk Online Forums
  Home membership Help Search Calendar Members Classifieds Treasury Store Links Gallery Media Center Login Register  
Custom Search
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Send this topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: DESIGN QUESTION FOR ED  (Read 2743 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« on: September 11, 2016, 01:46:31 PM »

Perusing your book Knife Talk I confirmed that you as many others almost always place a step down from the front of the guard to the top of the blade. I personally dont. Not trying to question your & others such as Bill Scagels design theory but could you please tell me the advantage of this, as for the life of me I cant see one. My decision to have the blade on the same height line as the handle is strictly aesthetic. Just wondering if Im missing something. Thanks for yours and others answers in advance.    

Logged
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2016, 04:00:49 PM »

I see several have read my post but I have no replys? I hope its because Yall are considering the question and not still laughing because of the simplicity of it. My only intention here is to find out if im missing an elementary feature in my blades. Still learning!
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3496



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2016, 08:42:14 AM »

Yours is a good question and you are the first to ask, this is just a busy time of the year for me thus the delay.

I like a slight step down just because it makes fitting the guard a little easier as I have room to work around the spine of the blade without the chance of leaving a streak of silver solder down the top of the guard. This fully encases the tang in silver solder and brass, and does not detract from function.  To my eye the drop before the blade provides a little break in the top line and an opportunity for me to add a little of what I call elegance to the package. Like any aspect of design there can be too much or too little, this is one aspect that you have to judge for yourself and unless you go to extremes will not be wrong, probably.  Smiley

There are many personal decisions on the part of a maker as he develops a knife, the more decisions you make the greater the individuality of your design. I hope I have answered your question, if not please feel free to discuss it some more.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2016, 10:12:26 AM »

Thanks Ed for the reply . One of the main reasons I make klnives is so that my product is an example of my thoughts. If I have made anyone here feel I was questioning anyones design theory please accept my apology. I personaly like my top line to be uninterupted  just because thats the way I like it. but after seeing your work and thinking about some others it got me to wondering . After all function before form in my opinion with that being said a knife much like a lady has to be pleasing to the eye before you will want to touch it. Well you get the Pic just wanted to make sure I hadnt overlooked something simple which I tend to do often. One day ill take the time to learn to post pics. I really do make knives not just talk about them.
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3496



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2016, 03:26:08 PM »

There is absolutely nothing wrong with an uninterrupted top line, the challenge is to keep them friendly to your hand.

Wayne and I used to talk about variables in design of knives and which ones are negotiable  and which were not. Some interesting discussions followed, we both found it good times.

I look forward to the day you post some photos of your knives. You have to use a hosting outfit, I use picture trail and along with them an outfit called Pixlr, PhilL has a tutorial posted on the forum how to use them.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2016, 06:04:16 PM »

From what I see on the forum they will be subpar but Im still learning on every knife. I like you stated once have a propensity to look for usable steel in all the wrong places.I just finished a knife using a piece of trk. mud flap spring . Havent tested it yet but she seems like a good one. seems stupid to use something like that when you have a sleeve full of certified 52100 but I just have to do it once in awhile. Thanks for your input.
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3496



View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2016, 07:44:48 PM »

So please tell us, do you forge, do your own heat treat, stock removal and what do you work with.
There are no wrong answers, we all started a long way from where we are now. I always enjoy watching others get started. There are a lot of very knowledgeable folks on this forum you have answers to questions we have not even thought of ourselves just waiting to be heard.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2016, 02:16:28 PM »

I as most other started with stock removal and simple hand tools. I read Wayne Goddards articles about cable damascus & was smitten but felt it was beyond my abilities until a trip to Dollywood where I met a hippy in a coon skin cap that was making cable damascus.I tried that then Jim Batson told me to just forge good steel and I took his advice . I now forge in a whisper momma gas forge use the magnet for critical temps and basically follow some guy in Wyoming as far as heat treatment is concerned. Anytime I am serious I use 52100 E from McMaster Carr. other times ill use springs , drill bits, etc. I do not have a tempering oven or a power hammer but do use low forging temps. My knives will cut 1/2 " rope over 100 times this is a far cry from what you advertise yours will do. Any tips you have that would raise the bar on my cutting would be appreciated. I do freeze between heats just like you recommend.
Logged
Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1131



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2016, 09:17:55 AM »

These are some good questions to be asking!
Logged

Consistent, Repeatable Performance is the goal
http://www.rohdeedge.com/
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2016, 01:29:07 PM »

Not having a power hammer requires more forging heats it seems to me even though I use low forging temps this would be detrimental to steel quality? Another question I have had is what is your def. of a lay of rope
one whole piece or one of the pieces produced by unwinding a piece ? Ive grown up in an age where pot went from a steel thingy to a brain rearanger and gay went from happy to wellllll you get the pic?
« Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 01:36:54 PM by Any 22 » Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3496



View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2016, 06:36:31 PM »

As long as you do not overheat the steel, over 1725 f, you will not hurt it with as many forging cycles as you need to shape your knife. Over hear for a very short time is not as apt to promote grain growth as when it is just overheated for a few seconds. You are at the right temperature when the scale comes off the billet as very fine flakes, about like powdered sugar.

Most of the time I walk a very narrow thermal band between too cool to move to just a little above the point of decal-essence, usually I am in the forge for about 5 minutes and then working the steel for 5 minutes, then back in the forge.
 

You can crack steel by forging too cold, but I do not feel this happens very often once we have a little experience.

Have fun with it, test your blades and keep records.

Usually three lays in a piece of rope, I always cut on one lay because it is easier for me to control the rope.

Do you have our DVD's?
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2016, 05:47:59 AM »

No do not have the dvds . I feel a little better as I thought you were cutting a piece of 1" rope so 1/2 in rope 100 times is closer than I thought. If you could buy a paragon oven or a power hammer which would you buy first?
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3496



View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2016, 12:59:48 PM »

I would buy the Power Hammer first. That way you can make better knives with a higher rate of reduction, start building your reputation and sell knives. Then you could use that money to buy the Paragon.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Any 22
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 19


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2016, 02:53:30 PM »

I do sell knives Im presently using 1" bar usually 3 to 4 " depending on how big I want it I never make more than 1 at a time I like to ponder them as they go . I still work for a living and this is still a hobby . I usually get 350 to 450 for a52100 knife I never short cut those. Ill try bout anything with a piece of mudflap spring, but stick to the plan with the 52100. Guess ill have to sell a few guns n get that power hammer. I have also looked at a press what is your opinion of a press vs a hammer? Ive pretty much got the front and back figured out its that inch or so between the plunge cut and the back of the guard that gives me fits yes i believe in a guard , a knife without a guard is much like a trk. without fenders just seems like you shorted the buyer. THIS IS JUST MY OPINION I still believe everyone should make knives as they invision them.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2016, 03:00:03 PM by Any 22 » Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3496



View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2016, 11:12:18 AM »

There have been several studies as to which provided the most uniform grain structure and the power hammer won out over the press every time.  You can make a good knife with a press, but if maximum performance is your goal the power hammer is  the way to go.

Guards take a little time to develop on a knife, but I will not make a knife without a guard.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Send this topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!