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Author Topic: New Neck knife!  (Read 2946 times)
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« on: March 05, 2015, 12:52:36 PM »

Here's another I worked on today. it still needs some detail work but its looking nice! first time using kirinite for me. This on is also a right handed knife
52100 triple quenched very slight convex grind.
This morning:




Later...




this has been a fun one!

-Daniel Rohde    

« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 12:59:23 PM by Daniel Rohde (D-Vision) » Logged

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TomWhite
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2015, 05:41:54 AM »

Dan, are you doing this with a torch?  The heat treat looks almost perfect to me.  How many quenches?  It is an impressive looking knife, I would probably be reluctant to take it fishing.  I would be afraid to get it dirty.  Very nice.
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2015, 05:45:44 AM »

Now I see the triple quench.  You must have a very steady hand.  Great knife.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2015, 05:01:35 PM »

Thanks Tom! yep it triple quenched. I hope it will get dirty! but I do really like the look of the etch the hardened portion is basically mirror finished with the some back giving really nice

contrast (besides that functional value)

DR...
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2015, 06:02:28 PM »

So I ground through the corby on one of the pins Cry so I can't feel good about selling this one and it's going to be a personal knife of mine for a while, which will be a good chance for me to

test out kirinite better but anyway.... I was wondering, do you think asking a knife like this to cut a nail in halve(hammering it through a nail) without edge damage is a reasonable test of a

neck knife?

DR...
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Joe Calton
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2015, 09:07:05 PM »

great looking necker Daniel!! and that sucks about grinding through the corby bolt.

for me, it would really depend on cutting a nail in half with a necker. for an everday carry necker I would say no, I wouldn't want anything built tough enough to cut a nail in half with the extra weight that would entail hanging on my neck.

now for a kayak knife, I might say yes, as my life vest would take up some of the weight and keep it off my neck, and I could see a stouter knife coming in handy there. or if I were to be wearing a shirt with a collar that would spread the weight out.

It could be that I have a sissy neck, or haven't carried one long enough to get used to it, but I like to stay on the lighter side for neckers. of course I see them as being a light utility knife and not serious working knife.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2015, 05:53:02 AM »

okay, I just had another neck knife with out a handle that is very similar to this on and I wanted to test my heat treat and it has be taking the edge flexes just fine just when I hammered it

through a nail it made a impressing in the edge and I was wondering if that meant my heat treat is faulty for a 3/32" thick 52100(it's hard to tell whether it chipped or dented)
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2015, 08:40:20 AM »

Look closely and you can see the difference between a chip and a dent. A magnifying glass will let you see it.

Nice knife, I like to see that you put your name on the Ricasso, thus not adding a stress raiser to the blade.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2015, 11:33:36 AM »

I did look at it pretty closely and it locked like the very edge chipped and then bent...that's how it looked anyway(I'll get a picture of it up tonight)

Quote
Nice knife, I like to see that you put your name on the Ricasso, thus not adding a stress raiser to the blade.
Thanks Ed! I messed that up once and hopefully won't again;)
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mreich
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« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2015, 10:10:18 AM »

The difference in edge geometry is a huge variable.

Try putting a 25* convex edge on the knife. You might have to look closely to see a dent.

I've hammered neck knives through regular grade 3/8" threaded rod a bunch of times, just testing different edge geometry.

The difference can be very dramatic.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2015, 12:45:50 PM »

I have bee sort of trying different geometries because when I chipped the blades I ground them back with a steeper convex grind. the first time I tried the nail cutting the blades had only a 335F temper then a 350F today I'm tempering them at 380F(bigger jump) and will see what that does. When I saw you used threaded rod I went and tried it(at a 350F temper) and needless to say it failed(see pictures) so I'll let you know how the high temper works out.

The blade went about a quarter of the way in(3/8" bolt standard grade) and it sort of broke a chip out there are some other chips from the nails as well.






also, the spine was starting to mushroom a bit


DR...
« Last Edit: March 29, 2015, 12:49:15 PM by Daniel Rohde (D-Vision) » Logged

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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2015, 05:10:30 PM »

The higher temper did not seem to change how it cut the bolt. The grain appears to be very fine. but seen as I was on a metal smashing rampage I dig into my blade junk pile and found the

one from this thread: http://knifetalkonline.com/smf/index.php?topic=1702.msg13126#msg13126 I was curious about how well it would do ona bolt to I got a 1/4x?(the standard size has

slipped out of my head anyway standard thread and grade 1/4" bolt) and it went through the bolt not problem absolutely not edge damage(at very most it looked a little dull) so that was

impressive! then I took the same knife and cut a 3/8" bolt(cutting in the same portion of the blade) still no edge damage. I then tried cutting a 3/4" angle iron in halve and it went in pretty

far but then it blew a chip out of the edge(I think the knife had come out and I was placing it back in as I swung the hammer and I hit it sort of sideways making chip out) this blade looks to

be about 5/32" thick(maybe a touch less) with a fairly heavy convex grind. I'm thinking the geometry of the blade has allot to do with how well the blade passes this particular test. The

blade I linked to also did not do very well in the tip test when I ground a sharp tip on it.  


For information sake the original blade thickness we were talking about is 3/32" and I'm using a 2lb ball peen hammer to hit these blade through the material, starting with light hits to get

the blade started and then taking some heavier swings. The grain in all the blades appear to be very fine(merely speculation but I can tell grain in it, it's just a silky gray) I'm not sure

when I would need to hammer a neck knife through a 3/8" steel bolt but it's sort of fun to see what it can do.

Could my regrinding be messing up the metallurgy in the very edge causing problems? I'm getting similar edge damadge with a 380F temper as a 335F temper so why not go for the 335F?

I have more testing to do I guess Grin

Daniel Rohde
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2015, 05:13:56 PM »

Oh! and one more thing. I decided to flex what was left of the neck knife(so no more edge test with this one) and the mushroomed spine seemed to have some really weird effects on how it bent. Just say'en....
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2015, 02:14:30 PM »

It sounds like you have caught the testing bug, you will learn a lot. Congratulations!
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2015, 07:23:52 AM »

Yeah! It's fun to take a knife and just use it allot to find out what it can do(or can't)
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