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Author Topic: My favorite Loveless knife  (Read 6218 times)
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Ed Fowler
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« on: January 20, 2015, 11:55:59 AM »

My favorite Loveless knife, forged stainless steel from 1958.



What do you think?    

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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2015, 01:08:21 PM »

I love it! looks great!
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John Silveira
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2015, 05:51:18 PM »

Wow ! what a prize.

mind if i make one just like it ?  Roll Eyes
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TomWhite
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« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2015, 03:20:34 AM »

 Was stainless a very common steel in these type knives then? Particularly forged?  The sheath has no snaps either, they were on most all commercial knives of the time.  Loveless was definitely on the cutting edge in a lot of different ways.  The knife looks hollow ground, didnt he use this on most all the knives he made?  That is a great knife.  And I bet pretty rare also. 
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2015, 01:01:40 PM »

From what I understand Gill Hibben started forging 154 CM in the early 50's, as did Bob Loveless, they forged it because they could not buy it it in a size that was appropriate to make knives from.

Yes the blade appears to be hollow ground.
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TomWhite
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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2015, 05:40:18 PM »

Thanks for the history Ed.  These guys set the ground work for all these stainless knives we see marketed today, I guess.  It takes someone willing to try stuff that has not been done before to move ahead sometimes.  As I recall, the only thing early commercial stainless knives had going was that they wouldnt rust.
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TKirk
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2015, 07:09:04 PM »

Is it flared towards the front 1/3 (Price grind)?
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2015, 10:18:04 PM »

The knife has some attributes of the Price knives I have seen. I have never been able to hold this knife in my hands so do not know if it has a reverse taper or not.

I do like her lines, the concave line on the spine is very pleasing to me. As has been mentioned the scabbard is a pouch type and very well done.

Just for grins: What would you change about the knife?
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2015, 06:03:41 AM »

I like the little knife the way she is but I suppose if you wanted her a little better I would:

A: sheath-no rivet at the top if the sheath and i don't really like the stitching he has, if you cut it in one place its going to unravel

B: handle-I like the top line of the handle but I would get rid if the finger grooves guard could be a little longer a slimer

C: blade is fairly nice other than the hollow grind. the swedge is debatable personal i like it there.

That's what I see any way

DR....
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2015, 12:30:32 PM »

Excellent observation on the rivet, the leather will soon tear out, rivets cut through leather pretty fast, just look at old sheaths at gun & knife shows and you will understand.

I like your other observations as well.
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TomWhite
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« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2015, 06:42:42 PM »

The knife has been in a drawer for many years if the rivet is a factor.  I suspect it probably has been.  I think, as for the finger grooves, this helps for indexing the knife, ie., look at the golden spike by shrade, (a very popular commercial knife) that came out around 1972 or so.  Hollow ground knives were desirable in these years because they were easy to sharpen, so I dont think, at this time, this was a bad idea.  I dont know how hard stainless knives were to sharpen then.  For me they still a challenge.  I think it's in its  time this knife must have been quiet a knife, with its sheath very well well made compared to most of the time, (look at the stitching).  It is just a little different from what we know to work better now.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2015, 05:55:46 PM »

Many times I force the tip of my knife into its work, I like to pound on the butt of the handle with my hand.
The sharp aspect of the top of the butt would make this very uncomfortable. While not quite as stylish, it would be more functional for me.

What to you think?
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John Silveira
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« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2015, 10:46:05 PM »

 agree!
that point of the butt caught my eye too , but i guess i don't have yhe mindset for performance just yet so didn't give it but a passing thought .

would certainly be easy nuff to round off but not sure i would with a Loveless ya know
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TomWhite
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« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2015, 03:38:11 PM »

Thanks for the tip on the butt "tip", you are totally right.  Style sells knives and BW sure had some. Case had it right mostly in these days with the butt, also several of the other company's.  One thing I would have changed, which brought your knives to my attention early on, is how short the racisso is.  I used a bunch of these type knives in the 60's and 70's and inevitably, I would always get "bit" by the edge when sliding forward with my grip past the guard.  I dont know why this always seemed necessary, I guess for more control.  The only one that didnt usually "bite" was my puukko, which had no guard at all, thus I paid attention.  It was limited, of course, in heavy work.  And you wanted to make dang sure you had a good hold on it when punching into something, you better have a thumb heel on the butt.  We're talking major damage here if you slip.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2015, 09:50:16 PM »

Absolutely: The ricasso can easily be a very functional part of the knife, especially when coupled with an adequate bolster and guard. Many do not see it, but once they have used one they really understand.
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