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Author Topic: Finished one - Hallelujah  (Read 1491 times)
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John Silveira
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« on: December 23, 2014, 08:50:16 AM »

52100 post forge quenching and normalizing - One Hardening.


   

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mreich
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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2014, 07:01:59 PM »

That looks nice, John Smiley

Please tell more about it.

What size are the pins?

How did you harden it?

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John Silveira
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« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2014, 02:05:19 AM »

used the Texaco oil got from Ed.  Have a tray to quench in with a adjustable mesh grate so it's easy to raise or lower the grate to control depth of quench.

Don't have acetylene tanks hooked up yet so i do my best to heat the edge of the blade without going into the spine as much then quench - went tip down in the oil and rocked it back and forth fairly rapidly several times then just let the blade lie flat in the oil to cool - Preheated the oil.

the pins are 1/16th and the Mosaics are about 1/4 hollow.

i pre-drill the handles and liners then mount them to a piece of leather so i could knife edge the whole works at the front of the handle - ( Create a taper ) that way the black G-10 liner shows from the side rather than flush with the front of the Ghost Jade handle.   

I put a real quick edge on it ( couldn't wait ) before i was done with the blade and it got sharp sharp sharp.

This blade was hammered down from about 3/4 inch thick bearing race.   

Feel real good about the steel on this one - everything felt right during the whole process.

I'm not sure what difference 3 anneals would make - i usually only do one - Maybe Ed will talk about that. 

Blade has a fairly heavy spine and it's got a very subtle convex grind to the edge.

I ground the edge a little thinner than i usually do .

Sold to a guy from FaceBook.   

I don't feel i charge enough - 250$ for this one with sheath - my rock bottom for a blade this size. I have a friend that reams me every time i tell him 250 $ is what i charge - i want to tell him " Try and sell a blade for much more and see what it's like -  I'm sure i have 25 hours into the blade. I like to make at least 10 bucks an hour - which in reality is a JOKE especially when i charge 145 $ to shoe a horse and i get it done in 45 minutes.  But ya know i just love making the blades.

anyway - gota go - thanks for the comment 

cheers
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TomWhite
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« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2014, 02:04:08 PM »

You can?t place a price on time spent making knives, it?s much more than just a way of making money for most of us, I guess.  I?ll bet the more you sell, the more people will want one of your knives.  This one is really impressive and even by looking at the picture it just seems sharp. 
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wnelson aka. dedox
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« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2014, 06:46:28 PM »

You save a lot of money by making knives in batches.
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"The enemy has only images and illusions behind which he hides his true motives. Destroy the image, and you will break the enemy."-Bruce Lee

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John Silveira
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« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2014, 09:16:38 PM »

You can?t place a price on time spent making knives, it?s much more than just a way of making money for most of us, I guess.  I?ll bet the more you sell, the more people will want one of your knives.  This one is really impressive and even by looking at the picture it just seems sharp. 

You're right Tom
but if i was famous like Ed or others this might go for 600 instead. Now that's a usable chunk of money - I can burn through 250$ in a heartbeat though.   
But it's all good.
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John Silveira
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« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2014, 09:17:47 PM »

You save a lot of money by making knives in batches.

I just can't seem to get behind mass producing yet ( batches ). So for now i'll just have to keep EAT'N it !!!   Haha
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #7 on: December 25, 2014, 04:52:46 PM »

The money made was just a way to be able to afford more experiments and share with those who wanted one.

Freedom and the joy that surrounds it are the most significant aspects of making knives for me.

Two anneals are better than one by a good margin, three are just a little better. Photomicrographs showed a big difference between one and two. This  was also very significant when it comes to temper, and naturally hardening.

I was just reviewing Kevin Gray's thesis on our work and it has all been documented. We hope to publish it this coming year. You will see it here on Knife Talk.
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Joe Calton
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« Reply #8 on: December 25, 2014, 06:31:49 PM »

good looking knife John, congrats on it!!

about the money part, some things just need to be done, regardless of money. the knives that are in your head have to be let out and shared with those who appreciate them, and the only way to do that is to make them and let them out. that may sound kind of odd coming from a guy who says "anything worth doing, is worth doing for a profit" pretty often, but there it is. I truly believe that if you keep making "your knife" {or knives} that the money will follow if you wish it to, and if not, then you can say that you had a great time making knives anyway.
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John Silveira
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« Reply #9 on: December 25, 2014, 08:04:01 PM »

The money made was just a way to be able to afford more experiments and share with those who wanted one.

Freedom and the joy that surrounds it are the most significant aspects of making knives for me.

Two anneals are better than one by a good margin, three are just a little better. Photomicrographs showed a big difference between one and two. This  was also very significant when it comes to temper, and naturally hardening.

I was just reviewing Kevin Gray's thesis on our work and it has all been documented. We hope to publish it this coming year. You will see it here on Knife Talk.


That sounds Huge Ed. Great anticipation i look forward to the publication.

thanks for the comments everyone and Merry Christmas

Now time for some 2 wheel fun -   
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