Knife Talk Online Forums
  Home membership Help Search Calendar Members Classifieds Treasury Store Links Gallery Media Center Login Register  
Custom Search
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Send this topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: Ultra High Carbon Steels  (Read 2439 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
ChrisAnders
Newbie
Trade Count: (0)
Sr. Member
*
Posts: 193


View Profile
« on: November 30, 2014, 08:25:55 PM »

I ran across an article on UHCS (ultra high carbon steels) on another forum and thought I'd post it here.  It's a pretty long article, and I've not read it all yet, but I did get through the first few pages where it talks about superplasticity (tensile stretching of up to 1000%) with no indication of failure at the end.  The initial testing was done with plain carbon steels in the 1970's.  They were using high temperatures (2100 F or close to it) and forging or rolling, along with progressively lowering the temperatures to generate very fine carbide structures which were used to pin grain boundaries and generate and maintain average grain sizes as much as 4x smaller than an ASTM Grain Size of 15 (0.5 microns vs. the 2 microns of an ASTM 15).  I don't know the details on how it was done, but they were also using high deformation rates (200% per minute in some cases) along with the high temperatures to get the structures they needed.  The idea was that the high carbide volume pinned the grains and prevented them from growing at the high temperatures.  The high temperatures were needed to allow the high deformation rates needed to generate new grains rapidly enough to minimize the grain size.  The superplasticity comes from the grains being so small that they will slide past each other at the high processing temperatures, allowing improvements in forming and shaping of final pieces.  The link below takes anyone who wants to read it to the paper, which I found in a link on the Spyderco forum.

http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/756907

   

Logged
ChrisAnders
Newbie
Trade Count: (0)
Sr. Member
*
Posts: 193


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2015, 07:29:40 PM »

Nothing huh?  Does anyone here work with such high carbon steels (1.25% and up)?
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3448



View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2015, 10:13:50 PM »

Rex and I talked about it once and he felt that we had more than enough carbon in our 52100. Thus I have never tried any of them.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1100



View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2015, 06:42:37 PM »

I was wondering what steels there are that even have that much carbon? so I went an looked these were the only ones I saw after a quick look (CPM S35-VN, CPM-D2,and CPM S30V Very popular knife steels) I have not used any of them thought I would like to try them sometime.
Logged

Consistent, Repeatable Performance is the goal
http://www.rohdeedge.com/
ChrisAnders
Newbie
Trade Count: (0)
Sr. Member
*
Posts: 193


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2015, 04:12:47 AM »

The article is really talking about plain carbon steels, like 1095 just with 1.25% to 1.5% carbon.  Those steels you mention could probably take advantage of the proccessing, but it would be a bit more complicated due to all the alloying in those steels.
Logged
Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1100



View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2015, 05:36:41 AM »

Oh I guess I didn't catch that...I don't really know of any steels with that much carbon other than Japanese steel.
Logged

Consistent, Repeatable Performance is the goal
http://www.rohdeedge.com/
ChrisAnders
Newbie
Trade Count: (0)
Sr. Member
*
Posts: 193


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2015, 09:22:00 AM »

Me either.  At one time you could get W2 and W1 in those carbon contents, but I doibt there is enough demand now.
Logged
Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1100



View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2015, 10:55:22 AM »

Well where I get my steel from you can get W2 and W1 and his W2 only has 1.0% carbon http://newjerseysteelbaron.com/shop/w-2/
Logged

Consistent, Repeatable Performance is the goal
http://www.rohdeedge.com/
stuartdavenport
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 10


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2015, 09:52:18 AM »

Hitachi Shirogomi White Steel has well over 1.0% carbon and about nothing else at all in it, except the iron of course! 

White 1 has about 1.3% carbon, and White 2 has about 1.1%. 
Logged
Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 1100



View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2015, 10:01:30 AM »

I'm not sure where you could get White steel though
Logged

Consistent, Repeatable Performance is the goal
http://www.rohdeedge.com/
John Silveira
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 860



View Profile
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2015, 07:58:19 PM »

CPM  15 V ---------  3.40 c.
CPM  10 V               2.45 c.
D3                          2.15 c.
D7                          2.30 c.
Logged
stuartdavenport
Trade Count: (0)
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 10


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2015, 09:06:09 AM »

White steel can be bought from either Dictum or Workshop heaven.  I have a beautiful san mai White 2 utility.  Actually...the wife has it! 
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Send this topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!