Knife Talk Online Forums
  Home membership Help Search Calendar Members Classifieds Treasury Store Links Gallery Media Center Login Register  
Custom Search
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Send this topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: another Price grind , this time 52100  (Read 913 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
John Silveira
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 879



View Profile
« on: June 23, 2014, 08:27:18 PM »

Hello.
Hammered this little blade out of 52100 about 2 months ago - it's been sitting un ground till today - saw it sitting on the table and said " Price Grind " and had to go out to put the grind on. Took me about 1-1/2 hours to grind up including cleaning up the tang and hand sanding .

Ready for heat treating - will be triple quenching this one. So easy when the blade actually fits in my forge.

Should make a sweet little user - already took it to the wood stump and drove the tip in hard and broke out chunks of wood repeatedly without any fear of bending the tip. Not even heat treated/hardened ...

it's obviously a smaller blade 3-7/8 tip to guard shoulders

Will check back as progress continues
cheers

forgot to mention - i pushed the meaty part of the grind a ways forward , because the knife is on the small side the thinner section by the plunge is big and long for whittling with . it sure is easy to see how the Price grind adds so much strength to the blade structure.


   

« Last Edit: June 23, 2014, 10:07:03 PM by John Silveira » Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3505



View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2014, 07:49:15 AM »

Looking good, did you use the three post forging quenches?

I ask because I have found that unhardened blades that were subject to the post forging quenches often cut very well.
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
John Silveira
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 879



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2014, 11:18:07 AM »

Looking good, did you use the three post forging quenches?

I ask because I have found that unhardened blades that were subject to the post forging quenches often cut very well.


Hey Ed. to be honest i'm not remembering -- i made a few blanks to have on hand and i somewhat remember doin alot of quenching.
It sure came out of heat treat straight as an arrow as though it has been post forge quenched.

There's some kind of formations in the steel after heat treat - photo below --

i certainly am keeping the metal just at non mag and not going further than that as i was doing ( for some reason ) - blades still hardening just fine.

I've been having a couple questions running through my mind lately - i'll have to post up to the forum pretty soon

i was kinda surprised to see the hardening line on this blade where it positioned itself -  blade was very close to full quenched but when heating in the forge i'm able to get just the edge near the heat ( kinda like using an Oxy Acetyl torch ) and heat just the edge watching the color and testing for non mag.   Getting better at heating where i want to create the hardened steel .  Anyway - experience experience !!



Logged
John Silveira
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 879



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2014, 02:07:18 PM »



guard fitting

Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Send this topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!