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Author Topic: Quiz Time!  (Read 2239 times)
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jared williams
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« on: January 09, 2014, 02:09:20 PM »

So I decided to play with some edge geometry. take a look at the pictures of these two blades and make a guess and see if you can figure out what I did. They are both ground to 220 at this point. Take into account that they are different blade shapes but if you look close you may be able to tell what I did.





I figure this may be a bit of fun!    

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caknives
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2014, 03:44:55 PM »

This is what we were talking about just the other day right? l wont ruin it since i kniw the answer, but it looks cool! cant wait to hear how it does!
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John Silveira
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 08:39:49 PM »

Looks to me like ( lower photo ) you took the grind up higher and thinned out the blade a bit more so you have more of a taper to the edge.

Top photo looks like right at the belly of the blade is the thickest section of the grind - assuming the spine is close to the same on both the thicker blade at the belly could be a bit heavier ,  Might make a better chopper if it's big enough .

Blade on top has a thicker stouter tip Huh    Looks like the fattest part of the tip is further away from the tip so you'd have more metal overall to taper the tip more gradually yet still have a substantially strengthened tip

otherwise - what am i miss'n ? 

cheers
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John Silveira
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2014, 01:58:09 AM »

The Suspense is durn KILLIN ME !!! 
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jared williams
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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2014, 08:47:33 AM »

The trick to seeing what's going on is the light reflected off the blade. The bottom blade has a very typical modified price grind done to it. I.E. shallower convex grind near ricasso gradually changing to steeper towards the tip. The top blade is a bit different, it is a fighter so I wanted the belly of the blade able to cut deeply but still have a strong point and I wanted to be able to wedge things apart so here is what I did. the grind starts off as a steep convex grind at the ricasso then it gets shallower near the belly (that's why the light reflection drops down to the edge) then it quickly turns steep again at the tip so that the tip is stout. It was a lot of fun to grind and now it's time to do some testing!
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2014, 10:30:44 AM »

Way to go Jared, good lesson and photos that demonstrate the art and potential performance flexibility of the Modified Price Grind. There are no limits to our quest. Each of those knives demonstrate the complex nature of performance and make a flat grind blade appear rather sterile in comparison.
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John Silveira
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« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2014, 02:09:21 AM »

Way to go Jared, good lesson and photos that demonstrate the art and potential performance flexibility of the Modified Price Grind. There are no limits to our quest. Each of those knives demonstrate the complex nature of performance and make a flat grind blade appear rather sterile in comparison.

funny you say that ED - i've already just been realizing that , being as that's all i know is flat grinds at this point .....    Ok i'm gona sulk off and cry now .....   
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mreich
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2014, 07:47:41 AM »

Why isn't the grind at the ricasso shallow enough to be carried through the belly? Too easy?

Just had to be different and all complicated, Huh?

LOL!  Grin
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jared williams
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2014, 08:04:51 AM »

You nailed it Mark! Grin One of the joys of the price grind is the fun I have grinding it. I spent 20 years doing flat, hollow and straight convex grinds and I got bored with them. It just wasn't a challenge anymore. The price grind is something new every time! I have a large camp knife that will be on my table at blade that has a reverse distal taper and a modified price grind that places the thickest part of the blade at the front third of the blade and 2 thirds up from the edge......what was the point of doing it?..... Because I can, and it was fun to do! Grin
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2014, 10:11:20 AM »

The reverse taper grind was once called the reverse taper chip. Made by stone age man for many thousands of times. At first I thought I invented it, then when reading a about a bowie that was made around 1870 saw I was not the first, then thought some more and realized that many stone age knives I saw and found had reverse taper blades.

Kind of funny how we can see something in similar venues and not recognize it in our own.

But that is what is marvelous about knife making.
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mreich
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« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2014, 05:04:23 PM »

I completely identify with that, Jared.   Wink

Honestly, I clearly recall you, Ed and Chris making the smooth, practised passes across the belts, and the uniquely sweeping grinds they produced. It all made perfect sense, and looked so effortless.

I also remember starting out with a big ol' chunk of steel, and by the time it was about pen knife size, Chris comes over and says, "It's not there Yet?". LOL!!

Hell no, I had some steel left! Practicing that fluid, compound motion was mesmerizing.

Very good memories indeed.  Smiley
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caknives
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« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2014, 06:22:19 PM »

lol, sorry buddy  Grin but u get it now!  Those are some great times!
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