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Author Topic: Carbon content effects  (Read 575 times)
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John Silveira
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« on: October 24, 2013, 07:16:34 PM »

Just wondered if anyone has any comments on blades made in the .60 carbon content range .    too brittle ?   can it be tempered back down a bit ?

thnx    

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mreich
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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2013, 07:08:12 AM »

.60% is medium carbon, and the approximate carbon content of 5160, I believe. I can't really remember what constitutes "High Carbon" in bladesmithing terms.

You probably know we use a lot of 52100, but it's not unusual at all for guys to make big choppers and whatnot out of 5160. 52100 seems to behave a lot like 5160, but 52100 is High Carbon, at about 1.00%

Many guys use 5160 for tough blades.

It's only brittle if you've done something wrong.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2013, 07:57:29 AM »

Rex tells me that we are not using all of the carbon available in either 5160 or 52100, so we have more than enough carbon with these steels.

While 5160 has the reputation for being tougher than 52100, when done right with quality steel I have not see where 5160 is any tougher than 52100. Possibly the heat treatments used for the individual steels is the reason for this claim or: it may easily boil down to the availability of the steel used.

Students of this form and testing will soon find that it is easy to make a knife that exceeds the expectations of the client.

« Last Edit: October 25, 2013, 08:12:47 AM by Ed Fowler » Logged

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John Silveira
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« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2013, 12:15:27 AM »

Ok thanks .

i want to add an experience with 52100 i recently had ---    below is a photo of a blade i'm almost done with 52100.   At the time of forging i didn't think i had the ability to do all the triple quenches / heat treats and all that so i just did a couple normalizes ( and one to soften the steel - and then when blade was done with bevels just One Edge Quench ......   Below is the photo ..... i'm really new at this so be easy on me... anyway

the experience was when surface sanding the blade on my 4" belt sander with 60 grit i've never experienced before how easy this steel sanded ----  it was almost like the metal was being blown apart ... like dust ....  buttery soft .......   anyone else have that experience with 52100  ?           Ok - here's the photo

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mreich
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« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2013, 01:17:45 PM »

Considering that you can easily anneal 52100 down to about 12RHC, yes, it is buttery soft.
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