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Author Topic: the 220v problem  (Read 11440 times)
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« on: July 12, 2013, 12:30:52 AM »

does anyone other than me ever have trouble with the fact that you don't have 220v plugs I keep running into this have others had the same problem? have you found a way to get around it?
Thanks
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2013, 02:20:07 AM »

There is probably a 220 plug in your kitchen, maybe, but not probably your mother might share it with you. (smile)

When I needed 220 I just talked to an electrician. Sometimes they will trade their work for a knife.
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Joe Calton
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« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2013, 02:51:33 AM »

Kitchen ovens, and electric dryers most of the time are 220, or as long as there is space in your breaker box, running a new circut doesnt take much.
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chad2
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« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2013, 08:28:58 AM »

I am an electrician and will be back with how to do it.
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mreich
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« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2013, 04:09:01 PM »

It's very simple. You only need space for a double breaker in your panel. I've done it myself a bunch of times (last time, last week), but it's cool that Chad is an electrician. I'll be interested to hear his explanation.

One thing I know he'll want to know is what you're trying to hook up, and how many amps it draws. That information will be on the plate on your motor, unless it's something with a hidden motor or heater (like an oven or a dryer). Then the info it will be in the direction book. How far do you need to go from the panel?

It's not a problem unless you are working with old wire (which is normally too small gauge) or a full panel. The power requirements of modern living often outstrip the capacity of old power service. 
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2013, 04:41:26 PM »

I looked at it and I believe it will work I have several places it would work ( openings). not having 220v has been a bit annoying because I cant run the thing I need to build a power hammer and just other things. I don't think I can do any of the wiring but my dad is an electrical engineer and mite be able to do it. I work in the basement and the box is in the basement so should be very reasonable to do.
thanks for the great advise guys! and chad I can't wait to see what incite you can give!
Dv...
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mreich
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« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2013, 05:53:32 PM »

Do you have provisions to accurately cut your steel?

If you don't already have a 50 amp 220 circuit for your welder, I assume you don't have a big enough welder either. You can't weld in your basement without a lot of air circulation. You need flat concrete and at least 1/2" steel plate to start.

That's probably step one, and you're looking at a pretty major investment if you don't have it.

A hammer is pretty darn heavy, like 1000lbs or so for a little one, so it's not very mobile at all. If you build it in your basement, it's going to stay there. It also makes a lot of noise and deep vibrations. I can feel my hammer at least a couple hundred feet away, and it's bolted to a Very Large piece of concrete.

The 220v problem is absolutely nothing in comparison.

A hammer like mine, and the compressor to run it runs about $8k.

Just the equipment I have in order to make a hammer are about the same price.

Not trying to be a downer, friend, but you might need to re-evaluate the situation.

Maybe find an anvil and build a small forge first. That much is do-able.
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chad2
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« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2013, 09:16:20 PM »

Yes depending on amps and when the house was built will help me give you a better answer. If it was a 220v kiln which does not pull very many amps  I would say that you do not need to worry about the age of the wire. But a 220 volt motor made to run that size of hammer different story.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2013, 12:39:59 AM »

Quote
A hammer is pretty darn heavy, like 1000lbs or so for a little one, so it's not very mobile at all. If you build it in your basement, it's going to stay there. It also makes a lot of noise and deep vibrations. I can feel my hammer at least a couple hundred feet away, and it's bolted to a Very Large piece of concrete.

The 220v problem is absolutely nothing in comparison.

A hammer like mine, and the compressor to run it runs about $8k.

Just the equipment I have in order to make a hammer are about the same price.

Not trying to be a downer, friend, but you might need to re-evaluate the situation.

Maybe find an anvil and build a small forge first. That much is do-able.
I appreciate your strait forward answer mreich I need good advise(we all do) especially when you have a bad idea and you pay for it.
I probably new it was a bad idea but I hate feeling like I'm not making the best (larger forging ratios) because I'm not doing all I can but maybe right now that's unrealistic-though I still enjoy learning how they work and why they work so thanks for telling me what you really think! I wasn't actually thinking of building a power hammer in the basement maybe in a lager shed or barn... so on the topic how do you move something like that?

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mreich
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« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2013, 05:32:20 AM »

As always, you are surely welcome DV. It takes good reasoning and more than a dash of humility to take advise as well as you seem to.

You can move a hammer with a rentable skid-steer and rolling it around on steel gas or water pipe,  3/4 - 1" in diameter. Going up or down stairs, maybe you can make it disassemblable.

It seems like I just said this, but if you could get out for a seminar at the Willow Bow, you can forge 1 3/4" round stock into whatever size that would be easiest to hand forge the size knife you want to make. I did that for quite a while.

I can tell you that a round that size will make about 30 thin neck knives. I really like making them because you get way more knives and way more practice with forging and HT making 30 blades than 10.
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Joe Calton
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« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2013, 01:25:17 PM »

just a thought, but if you live in a rural area, and have sheds or barns, you could use an engine to power your hammer. nobody ever said in the big book of home built power hammers that they have to run on electricity.

see if you have any 5 horse lawnmower engines laying around, one of those should run a hammer pretty easy, you would then have to buy and transport fuel for it, but for how long you usually use a power hammer for per month it wouldn't be too bad. I usually run my hammer maybe 10 hours a month depending on what im making that month.

of course it might run a bit faster than an electric motor, but that's why you have a throttle, pulleys, different diameter wheels, ect......
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2013, 07:52:45 PM »

just curious why are high HP 3 phase motors so cheap at craigslist I can get lots of what I think are nice motors really cheap are they not very good?
and will a motor say on the label if it is an TEFC case?
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chad2
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« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2013, 11:28:21 PM »

just curious why are high HP 3 phase motors so cheap at craigslist I can get lots of what I think are nice motors really cheap are they not very good?
and will a motor say on the label if it is an TEFC case?

It all depends on how they are made most likely under dusty dirty conditions they will not last very long. Also make sure they are brushless first this will be a big indicator if the motor will give you a little more life. But usually when it comes to electronics, more expensive is better .
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Joe Calton
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« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2013, 12:54:03 AM »

my first though as to why used 3 phase motors are cheap is that not many folks have 3 phase power. if not a lot of folks can use a motor, then the price goes down.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2013, 02:28:19 AM »

I'm just wondering if 3 phase means cheapy? heres on for example http://rmn.craigslist.org/mat/3928351262.html
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