Knife Talk Online Forums
  Home membership Help Search Calendar Members Classifieds Treasury Store Links Gallery Media Center Login Register  
Custom Search
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Send this topic  |  Print  
Author Topic: Handles- design,construction, materials  (Read 2569 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« on: February 11, 2007, 01:33:38 PM »

Handle design for cutlery of all types and for the tools required to make them are not given as much thought as may be warranted. By doing a search on this forum for "handle design" I see that the subject has been touched on many times. Ed Fowler and others have developed sound opinions on the subject.

   

« Last Edit: January 12, 2008, 12:07:24 PM by radicat » Logged
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2008, 12:14:39 PM »

The hammers we use come with handles that seem to have been given about as much thought in their design as a broom handle. Any ideas out there about how these various hammer handles could be improved to reduce fatigue and  injury, and give more control? Maybe some pics of your favorites?
Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2008, 04:50:16 PM »

Most hammer handles used in the forge are made of wood.
The advantage there is that you can sand and shave wood to make it fit your hand better.

The draw back of wood is that it gets slippery and after a while it can crack and break off the hammer head.
I think everyone who works with a heavy hammer at the forge will sooner or later try to change the way the handle works to make it better.

I have a real problem hanging onto a hammer with my gloves on in the winter.  The hammer handle tends to spin in my grip as I use it.
Logged
Ed Fowler
Administrator
Trade Count: (1)
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 3448



View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2008, 04:15:09 PM »

I have never been able to use a glove on my hand that works the hammer, for me it is a sure way to develop some sore tendons.

My favorite handles are made by Vaughn. You naturally have to pick through them, and modify the shape to fit your favorite handle, but most are very well designed.

I find that when you look at the end of the handle and find the grain running from about 1:30 to 7:30 they transmit much less shock to my arm. I learned this when my shoulder was cratering and again while it was healing up, even minor shock was very significant. I wonder: had I used handles with this grain from the beginning would I have developed the shoulder problems?
Logged

Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
http://edfowler.com/
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2008, 04:55:56 PM »

If a person has to grip harder because of a glove, there is more strain on the hand and arm. Notice how when you make a fist, it is felt all the way to the shoulder. If you sustain an injury to the shoulder, you can't make a fist so easily.

My father taught me to lay my extended thumb along the hammer handle to use as a pointer or reference guide. It reduces the gripping ability, so can't always be done on a heavy hammer. I find myself going to a smaller hammer sometimes so I can do as he taught. He swung a hammer more than most men as a Master Carpenter and he had strong hands, so it was never a problem for him. He learned from a carnival strong-man how to wrap a 16 penny nail head with a handkerchief, place it in his hand with the nail sticking out between his fingers, and with a powerful punch drive the end of that nail through a 1 inch oak crate board. After trying that when I got older, I realized why other men left him alone.

My grandfather could grab a good size anvil by the horn and hold it straight up in the air over his head. Those old family reunions were something for a kid to remember, especially when my grandfather and his three larger-than-life brothers got together to show-off. All heroes of mine.
Logged
Alan
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 690


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2008, 08:40:42 PM »

If a person has to grip harder because of a glove, there is more strain on the hand and arm.
I have found that a wad of hockey tape on the handle at the base of the hand helps my grip when I have to wear gloves in the cold.
Logged
kbaknife
Member
Trade Count: (0)
Hero Member
***
Posts: 315



View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2008, 09:20:40 PM »


I find that when you look at the end of the handle and find the grain running from about 1:30 to 7:30 they transmit much less shock to my arm. I learned this when my shoulder was cratering and again while it was healing up, even minor shock was very significant. I wonder: had I used handles with this grain from the beginning would I have developed the shoulder problems?
Now I'm always gonna be looking at the end of my handles!!
You think of the wildest stuff, Ed!
I'm glad we met.
Logged

www.andersenforge.com


When the last deer disappears into the morning mist,
When the last elk vanishes from the hills,
When the last buffalo falls on the plains,
I will hunt mice for I am a hunter and I must have my freedom.
Chief Joseph, Nez Perce
radicat
Guest
Trade Count: (0)
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2008, 08:06:17 AM »

Don't go cutting down Grandma's favorite Mimosa shade tree, but maybe you know where you can find one that has to be removed or just trimmed a little. I know an old woman that has one, but she knows how to use her shotgun.

From this month's Great Throwzini newsletter:

THROWING TIP

GREAT WOOD FOR MAKING A HAWK HANDLE

Well I'm far from being a pro but I use the Mimosa Tree
as much as possible. After a Mimosa was cut near me some
years ago, I got permission to carry off as much of it as
I wanted. I took a bunch and wish I'd gotten more of it.

Its a very hard wood and has extremely tight concentric
growth rings. I have beaten a two inch thick limb on a
block as hard as I could in a test for breakability etc.
and it barely dented. Its light weight and strong.

Since then I've used it for hatchet handles, hammer
handles, tomahawk handles and knife handles. Never a
bobble.

Get an old fashioned 'spokeshave', it'll help you get the
shape you want. You might want to shape the wood within
a couple months of cutting unless your going to use power
tools. Its so tough it gets to where a knife won't cut it.

Try it you may like it (it is naturalized from New Jersey
to Louisiana and also found in California). If thats not
around, you may like the Pawlownia wood. Its light weight
but extremely dense for its weight. It is used in building
pianos so I'd say as much stress as pianos are put to and
guitar neck's are put to, it would most likely work well.

Tip Contributed By:

Tom Peterson
Arkansas Thrower


* mimosa.jpg (5.2 KB, 137x103 - viewed 219 times.)

* mimosa 2.jpg (4.32 KB, 86x129 - viewed 212 times.)

* mimosa 3.jpg (3.08 KB, 100x100 - viewed 221 times.)
« Last Edit: February 02, 2008, 01:33:25 AM by radicat » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Send this topic  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
TinyPortal v0.9.8 © Bloc
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!