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Author Topic: Frontier hawk  (Read 3369 times)
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Will
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« on: April 09, 2013, 07:31:58 PM »

A frontier, or early mountain man type hawk, wrought iron head, with a piece of truck spring for the bit.  Hickory haft.  Hopefully I will be able to turn out a nice pipe hawk before too long.
   

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wnelson aka. dedox
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2013, 07:38:54 PM »

very nice!
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2013, 10:13:39 PM »

Did you weld it from the eye to the bit? or split the end for the bit? I have tried a few, mostly folding from the eye and adding the bit as I got close to the tip, but so far I have not had one turn out as nice!
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Ever since I took up forging, I have noticed that I am much less likely to hit my thumb with the hammer! 8-$
Will
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2013, 01:18:54 AM »

Thanks, it's a prototype of sorts, and the first one that came out well enough to consider parting with.  I welded it at the eye, then added a piece of truck spring a little less than half way from the end then welded together.  Here's a pic, not the best quality, but you can see the high carbon bit.  

Basically I forged the wrought iron down to 1 1/4" wide by 3/8" thick by about 4" long and took a 5/8" rod and while hot folded in in the open vise about center way.  Once I had a U shape going I just closed the vise to make the eye and a little stuck out the top and I spread it with a chisel.  I beat out a piece of truck spring to tapper the end and ground the hammer marks off and placed in the open end, fluxed and welded everything up on the anvil.  Which was kinda tricky because the bit wanted to slide out and I had to use the cross peen hammer and edge of anvil to weld next to the eye.  After that it was just a mater of using a tomahawk drift and carful forging to keep the bit centered, then a lot of thermal cycles on the bit to get the grain back down to somewhere close to normal and useful after the welding heats.  Clean up and etch, find a good piece of hickory and make the haft.  Never mind the collection of failed heads on the shop floor!  Next one will be a bit thicker on the ends to leave more room for the file work moldings and such, and maybe a pipe on the end.



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mreich
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2013, 08:22:17 AM »

I definitely keep the welder off my anvil. That's one of the quickest ways to damage an anvil.

Good to weld in/on an old vice.

just my 2cents

Plus I do like the hawk! Smiley
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Bill Burke
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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2013, 08:27:28 AM »

I definitely keep the welder off my anvil. That's one of the quickest ways to damage an anvil.

Good to weld in/on an old vice.

just my 2cents

Plus I do like the hawk! Smiley

how would/could you ruin an anvil weling? unless you're talking about electric welding.
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mreich
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« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2013, 09:07:09 AM »

Spatter, accidental electrode contact or arc jump.

If I were gas welding, I'd be concerned about annealing a spot on my anvil, getting flux on it, etc.

When I was at Murray's, he got kind of upset because I sat on his anvil. Said something like, "You don't park your butt where you make your money". I'm pretty sure it was just his way of saying, "Respect your tools".

I guess that just stuck with me, but I've heard Many times, "Never weld on your anvil".

If you look at old anvils, it's pretty easy to see the difference between an anvil that was cared for, or one that has been mis-used as a welding table.

My welding table cost about $10. My anvil was $2k.

I wouldn't care if I had a cheap anvil. It's still not the right place to weld IMO.

YMMV
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Will
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« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2013, 10:20:21 AM »

Thanks, and while it's a cheap anvil, the hawk is forge welded, not stick.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 10:22:49 AM by Will » Logged

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Bill Burke
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« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2013, 10:24:54 AM »

Spatter, accidental electrode contact or arc jump.

If I were gas welding, I'd be concerned about annealing a spot on my anvil, getting flux on it, etc.

When I was at Murray's, he got kind of upset because I sat on his anvil. Said something like, "You don't park your butt where you make your money". I'm pretty sure it was just his way of saying, "Respect your tools".

I guess that just stuck with me, but I've heard Many times, "Never weld on your anvil".

If you look at old anvils, it's pretty easy to see the difference between an anvil that was cared for, or one that has been mis-used as a welding table.

My welding table cost about $10. My anvil was $2k.

I wouldn't care if I had a cheap anvil. It's still not the right place to weld IMO.

YMMV


Yeh  I will Agree with that. My first impression was that you were talking about forge welding.
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Will
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« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2013, 10:43:52 AM »

I'll agree as well, I don't gas or stick weld on my anvils, both are harbor freight russian cast steel, cheap, kinda soft, but do the job and I spent a good bit of time dressing them to where there workable and don't want to screw them up.  I've seen a lot of old anvils that have been abused.
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mreich
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« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2013, 05:22:45 PM »

Well, I'm going to have to apologize for misunderstanding. I don't get to hear about forge welding enough, and assumed incorrectly.

Since I've seen how nicely a hydraulic press works for forge welding, I've been trying to put one together. It takes out all the dangerous drama with molten flux flying around, and really makes perfect welds.

I'm even more impressed now that I understand you're forge welding, Will. Smiley
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Will
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« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2013, 05:46:54 PM »

Thanks, I've got a hydraulic press, and used it on the hawk, but for the initial welds I had to do it on the anvil.
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