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Author Topic: Anything and Everything ?  (Read 18096 times)
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North
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« Reply #45 on: August 04, 2013, 10:05:11 AM »

Reference Ed?s post number 90 in this thread:

?Firearms are subject to many tests, some can put it over on the consumer and get away with it for a while, but are soon found out and folks start writing.? One of the problems that I see today in the internet knife world is that you seldom see reviews that are not favorable. I don?t think that most members of the knife community have any desire to hurt a maker?s business and as a result may be reticent to post anything that may be negative about the knives they buy or the maker?s business practices. I do see many reviews written by what I would describe as ?fan boys?.

?Part of our problem is that there are no bulls eyes, chronographs or hard data readily available to the knife community when it comes to describing performance.?
I?ll agree with that for sure. But also think that I understand some of the complexity of a task like that. I believe different sorts of knives designed for different purposes would need different standards of performance. For instance, a machete would probably have a different standard for performance than a paring knife, and a paring knife different than a survival knife, and on and on?

?All folks know is fit and finish, sometimes hints at performance and design.? To me that is sort of a blanket statement that paints with a very broad brush. I disagree with the word ?All?. That statement might be mostly true in some segments of the knife community but not necessarily true in all segments.

Bill
 
 

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« Reply #46 on: August 04, 2013, 10:47:14 AM »

Good comments:
I did not mean all people meaning everyone. I should have stated that all most people can know is fit and finish to provide an indication of performance qualities. In other words we are limited to fit and finish as indicators of performance qualities. We are forced to judge a book by its cover.

I was at a local sporting goods store and a customer asked me what knife was the best. I had not tested all of the knives, nor did I know all the outfits that made the large selection of knives. I told him it was like looking at a mirror, I pointed out some obvious faults, but could not tell anything about the performance qualities without buying one and testing it.

It is like the Charpy test, it tests steel as it comes from the steel mill, if that is the steel they are using for the test.
Some steels can be dramatically different when it comes to performance qualities by the way the steel is developed into a knife, or for the test.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2013, 10:49:22 AM by Ed Fowler » Logged

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« Reply #47 on: August 04, 2013, 10:31:18 PM »

What about this CATRA test, it is not "hard data"?

If i understand correctly what i read, CATRA is a (wear-resistance) test whereby the samples have to be exactly the same in terms of thickness, geometry, edge profile- for the results to be validated.  And, it does measure objectively. So, it would stand to reason that large companies making hundreds or thousands of nearly identical knives would probably find it the most beneficial.  Whereas a lone knife maker might not see much value to it, each of the knives he makes are not "clones", cannot be compared to each knife of another maker, exactly. And what is the incentive to do so?

This does present an interesting situation. With production knives, having similar properties are able to be tested against one another to a very close standard, being almost identical is an advantage for testing purposes. If there is to ever be such a thing as a "standard" of measurement it seems like the clones will have a purpose in getting there. There is no ego to harm, reputation to injure, as well. - they are primarily tools, knives. Not art.

A comment i read, looking for info on CATRA testing: (whether true, or false?)
"Yeah Spyderco has invested several million dollars in knife testing equipment."
http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/687808-List-of-manufactrers-makers-who-test-their-knives

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« Reply #48 on: August 06, 2013, 06:05:09 PM »

I feel that all testing is a good thing, you just have to ask what does the test seek to reveal.

Every knife maker has what he needs to test his knives in his shop, the knife is a simple tool and if the maker knows the well task the knife is intended to perform, he should have the knowledge and ability to test his knives doing what he wants they to do.

We as individual makers can gain knowledge by what the major makers learn and this is a good thing.
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« Reply #49 on: August 07, 2013, 07:10:39 AM »

From post #95:
 "I feel that all testing is a good thing, you just have to ask what does the test seek to reveal.

Every knife maker has what he needs to test his knives in his shop, the knife is a simple tool and if the maker knows the well task the knife is intended to perform, he should have the knowledge and ability to test his knives doing what he wants they to do.

We as individual makers can gain knowledge by what the major makers learn and this is a good thing."

I think those are very good points, Ed.

Bill
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« Reply #50 on: August 07, 2013, 09:27:49 PM »

I believe that one of the most lonely of all is an answer waiting for a question.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #51 on: August 09, 2013, 02:56:05 PM »

could you anneal in a barque?
could you anneal a 550*F ?
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« Reply #52 on: August 10, 2013, 08:26:48 AM »

The low temperature anneals are not really an anneal, but a high temp tempering heat. A 550 tempering heat may be enough, you will have to try it and see how it works, it will produce a soft blade.
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« Reply #53 on: August 11, 2013, 01:56:06 PM »

I fond this link on wood stabilizing really interesting for those who like making micarta and DIY(do it yourself) stuff http://www.veddermountainhardwoods.com/2009/02/27/stabilizing-techniques-for-small-pieces-of-spalted-wood/

DV...
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« Reply #54 on: August 14, 2013, 07:39:05 PM »

if you guys haven't looked at this site you should there's tons of stuff on building stuff like belt grinders,power hammers,and other power equipment http://www.homemadetools.net/tag/belt-grinder
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« Reply #55 on: August 19, 2013, 06:01:37 AM »

is it a good idea to break a 2" wide belt into 1" wide what I mean  is it dangeris?
DV...
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mreich
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« Reply #56 on: August 19, 2013, 07:19:42 AM »

Depends on a few things. What are you trying to do?

First, you'd have to find  way to slit them accurately. It wouldn't be difficult, but it would be necessary that you actually cut them. It may seem like they tear straight, and some would probably come close, but I wouldn't do it.

Econo-Abrasives will slit belts, cut and splice belts, or just flat make belts per your requirements. It's quite inexpensive as well as being very accurate.

A thinner belt needs a thinner "ridge" on the tracking wheel, so if you wanted a 1x72 belt, to work on a 2x72 machine, you would probably have to tear some ductape about 1/4- 3/8" wide, and make a narrower ridge on the tracking wheel.

If you have a Coote, or similar machine with a flat tracking wheel, you wouldn't have to do that.

If you find that you can use a 1" wide belt very often, I'd highly recommend getting a 1x42 Kalamazoo. I have 3. They are wonderful machines, especially when you get them on sale from Enco. I've seen them right at or a little under $200 delivered.

I use the heck out of mine. I need 3 when I'm sharpening at an event, and it's always nice to have one handy with the right grit on it for doing handles or scales especially.

They are widely used by professional sharpeners, but they don't come with a proper platen. I started making platens for them, because I do sharpen professionally, and I know a bunch of other guys that do too.

Kalamazoo caught wind of what I was doing, and contacted me to ask if it would be ok to copy my platens, and put them on their 1x42s, and call it a "Knifemakers' machine".

I was fairly stunned. I said of course, it would be great if they wanted to do that. It's necessary if you're working on blades.

I sent them a modified platen, they copied it, and sent me a dozen they'd made. They copied mine exactly. I don't know if you can order that platen from Kalamazoo now, or not. You can always get one from me.   
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« Reply #57 on: August 21, 2013, 12:45:42 PM »

Here's what my platen looks like. I cut a couple inches off the original wide part, then mount a 1" wide x about 3.5" tall piece onto what's left.





This is with a belt on. Had to take a picture from the side. It's adjustable, so the belt perfectly hides it from the front.

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« Reply #58 on: August 21, 2013, 01:13:22 PM »

looks good mreich! whats the Hp of your motor? Thanks for the Pic's


Hey Ed how thick is the price knife at the ricasso?
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« Reply #59 on: August 21, 2013, 09:11:57 PM »

It's a slow speed 1/3hp Baldor motor, with a 4" drive wheel.

I don't think you can buy the motor for less than the machine.
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