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Author Topic: A batch of neckers  (Read 2308 times)
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mreich
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« on: March 08, 2013, 08:23:21 PM »

Hope you like;
























   

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RAD
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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2013, 08:43:03 PM »

Really like the looks of those.
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billy brewton
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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2013, 10:43:50 PM »

The red yellow and blue yellow handle ones are those kirinite? 52100?? And im assuming u have trained with the great Mr. Murray Carter??
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2013, 03:16:26 PM »

Nice work Mark!

I can see the hardening line in the ricasso and know that the stress raiser created by the deep finger grove is not hard where it is weakest and would predict just from your etching that the blades can be depended on. I also see a second transition line above the hard line and know that you are pushing the steel to its limit of performance.

Etching is the mark of excellence for any blade, you have learned well.

Thanks for taking the High Endurance Performance Endurance blade to a new level.
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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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mreich
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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2013, 06:50:33 PM »

Thank you so much for the kind words, guys! Smiley

The red/yellow, blue/yellow and green/black material is from Eagle Grips, I believe. Cool stuff, but not real durable.

I have studied under Murray and Ed and Chris. Thankfully, Ed has a good relationship with Murray, so there are no issues with me learning from both of them. In fact, one time I went down to Ed's and forged several blades, then Ed and Chris did thermal cycles on those blades, while I went out to work with Murray again. When I got back to Ed's, I was immediately able to learn how to use sheep horn for handles. It meant a whole lot to me that we were all able to work together seamlessly.

Many years ago, I bought a neck knife from Murray, and fell in love with it. One thing led to another, and I ended up staying with the Carters for some time. Murray created a new apprenticeship program, and I'm his first "apprentice". I don't think my knives resemble Murray's very much, but if there is a resemblance, it's in my sub-conscience. I've never made two knives alike, although they may turn out similarly. Murray would allow me to make knives identical to his, but I didn't think that was very sporting. 

The important things that I do differently than Murray are my choils are much more pronounced, and I take my handle material farther forward to strengthen the blade where the deep choil leaves less steel. I use 52100 like Ed and Chris taught me to, instead of Murray's laminated Hitachi steel because it's much more economical, and I learn more about forging starting out with a 2" round.

Thanks again Ed, you taught me well.  Smiley

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wnelson aka. dedox
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« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2013, 06:48:53 PM »

does Murray know about the great performance of 52100?
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mreich
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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2013, 07:15:11 PM »

Murray and Ed seem plenty friendly with one another.

Murray uses Hitachi White #1, usually clad in stainless. It's pretty high performance stuff.

It's very unlikely that he would use US steel period.

I don't think the Japanese are very hard on their knives, and Murray is a pretty dyed in the wool Japanese style knife guy.

I haven't ever heard of Murray doing any testing.

At the price of that steel, it would be incredibly expensive to do the kind of testing I did on 52100.

Murray counts on his undeniably incredible amount of experience and sterling track record. He is a very gifted bladesmith, set in his ways.

 
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Will
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« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2013, 12:02:05 AM »

Looking good, looks like they should be hard working little knives, and I love the mix of handle material you have.
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mreich
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« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2013, 03:39:20 PM »

Thanks Will!

I love unusual handle material too. It's one of the main reasons I go to Blade. You can actually hold, and closely inspect the material instead of ordering site unseen.

I'll spend at least 1k on handle material at the show this year. Could be twice that. You never know what you'll find. I found 3 materials I'd never seen last year. Hopefully Lightning Strike CF will be less expensive this year. I really like it.

Those cool phenolic resin scales came from here; http://www.eaglegrips.com/

The material is not too difficult to use when you get the feel for it, and they have a wide variety.
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Will
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« Reply #9 on: April 10, 2013, 05:45:29 PM »

I'm with you on Blade, haven't been in a while, but need to get back down there, hopefully next year!
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