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Author Topic: Quenching oils  (Read 1316 times)
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« on: February 25, 2013, 06:26:54 PM »

what kind of quenching mediums have you guys tried?have you ever tried some bazaar ones?    

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mreich
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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2013, 07:43:22 PM »

I would never use something that isn't specifically made to do exactly what I want it to do.

Start with a steel that is a known quantity. Buy the quenching oil that maximizes the steel to your performance expectations.

Or you can use a lawnmower blade and used motor oil.

As long as I'm making knives, why not make the best I can?

It's really not much harder to do it right.



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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2013, 07:50:44 PM »

just asked if anyone has experimented with oils or quenching mediums.   
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mreich
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2013, 08:00:08 PM »

You don't need to experiment. You can go straight to what works.

Maybe I just don't understand.

Don't you want to give it your best shot?
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Joe Calton
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2013, 09:20:08 PM »

I have tried: tex a, canola oil, veg oil, corn oil, olive oil, automatic transmisson fluid, used motor oil, vet grade mineral oil, bacon grease, and goddards goo.

all worked to get the steel hard. whether it got as hard as it could have is a different story and Im not about to try some of them again to find out.

when choosing a quenchant, its not just the steel type and what works best for the steel itself, but also: availability, cost, health concerns, household concerns {as in it stinks up the house even through a closed door to the garage}, and probably a couple others.

what I remember about the different quenchants:

goddards goo, motor oil, transmission fluid- stink, stanck, stunk!!! talk about trouble with the missous! the worked at the time, I dont remmeber the steel not getting hard, they were cheap, as I was going to take them to recycling place anyways. where they optimal for the steel? dont know, was using junkyard steel at the time and didnt know exactly what it was. but the biggest problem was the smell, and my better halfs reaction to it!

olive oil smelled way better, but went rancid really quick, like in 2-3 weeks, and then the smell again

bacon grease, a really fast quench, if kept in a large mason jar works great for making small whittling tools out of old files and 1095.

the veg oil- perfect for large choppers and big blades that when edge quenched give off alot of smoke. Ive never seen a study, but since you cook with it, I cant imagine that the smoke is hazardous to health, and the smell isnt too bad, I keep it in jugs when not using it, and so havent had a problem with it breaking down or getting rancid. works great on 5160 and old leaf springs. cheap, no disposal problems of the old stuff.

Canola and possibly corn oil- canola is for 1095, and works great when edge quenching. corn oil may work just as well, I once cracked a big chopper in about 10 places with it it was so fast, so it may be ideal for 1095, but I havent tried it yet.

texaco type A- THE quenchant for 52100, Ed uses it. works extremely well. is expensive, only one place I know to get it, smoke has a funny smell, but not too bad with fans.


one of these days I would like to try plain water, just to see what happens. it is cheap, if using distilled it is conssistent, non haxardous, no funny smells, no disposal concerns, its readily avalable, and wont go rancid.
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wnelson aka. dedox
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« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2013, 08:07:53 AM »

I have a friend who keeps his bacon fat in his freezer and it never goes bad, and when he needs to use it he takes it out and heats it up. i even quenched a blade in it and it hardens the steel very well, plus the smell reminds me of bacon frying for breakfast Cheesy
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