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Author Topic: Knife Video Question  (Read 10808 times)
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2013, 05:24:20 AM »

My first response is Why not? but seriously it has been a very long day and I had to have a little fun with it.

I want the tip to start the transition, feel that when the rest of the blade is in the oil it is still cooling the tip at the same time, then back to the tip in the oil, it has the least volume and I feel the tip should be a little tougher than the rest of the blade. The belly or first third of the blade will do the most work, all the tip has to do is be strong and tough to get you into your work, it is the belly or first third that does most of the work.
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Daniel Rohde (D-Vision)
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« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2013, 11:01:50 PM »

hey Ed when you solder your guard's are you afraid that the torch will ruin the temper in the blade?   
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« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2013, 02:36:54 AM »

hey Ed when you solder your guard's are you afraid that the torch will ruin the temper in the blade?
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2013, 04:54:19 AM »

Very Good question D-Vison!

The ricasso has many functions, one of them is that it acts as a heat sink that allows me to silver solder the guard without the temperature influencing the cutting edge. Once the silver solder flows, I cool it with a wet paper towel to assist in preventing the heat to influence the cutting edge.
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mreich
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« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2013, 05:52:49 PM »

I stuff the blade into the clay heat sink stuff from the welding store. I even wiggle it around as I push the guard a little ways into the clay too.

It not only guarantees your blade will stay cool, it also doesn't allow solder to run out.

I use a dixie cup full, and the blade comes out the bottom of the cup, so you can still easily hold the blade in a vise or whatever while you solder.
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« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2013, 02:37:22 AM »

nether Q Ed why do you use the type of stitching you use?
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2013, 04:57:12 PM »

When we take the time to groove a piece of leather so a stitch and sit down level with the surface of the leather we actually cut out the strongest face of the leather, the flesh side.

Round thread can cut through leather.

Ludlow Industries Waxed Lacing tape is flat and will not cut leather and is very strong.

I wanted to use the strongest stitch for my scabbards with the above in mind and have enough thread that while above the surface of the leather would not be worn though. The chain stitch proved to be it.

Should the outside of the stitch fray, all you have to do is take a lighter and melt the frayed filaments down into the bulk of the stitch and it is fixed.

AND - I like it!
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« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2013, 08:46:45 PM »

why do you use such heavy leather why not 10 or 12 ounce leather?
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« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2013, 03:50:43 AM »

We purchase 12-14 ounce Waxed Harness leather and split it down to fit the size and design of the knife. If we want part of the scabbard heavier or lighter we can do it. I don't remember any scabbards going out at 14 ounce, but they usually start that way. The heavier weight leather comes from cattle slaughtered in the winter when hides are the thickest.  I believe it is the best we can get to start crafting a scabbard. Call it freedom to build it our way. Takes more time and skill + a very expensive leather splitter but it is worth it in my opinion.

Ask any trapper about the difference between winter and summer hides and you will find someone who agrees with us.

If we only bought 10 ounce leather we would be limited to that weight.

You really ask some great questions, I thank you for you take me back to decisions we have made many years ago and bring back a lot of memories.

How about you, where do you live, do you make knives or? Please tell us a little about yourself if you would like to.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 04:13:51 AM by Ed Fowler » Logged

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« Reply #24 on: March 04, 2013, 05:06:42 PM »

Ed do you burnish the edges of your sheathes? why don't you put any logo on the sheath?
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« Reply #25 on: March 04, 2013, 05:10:06 PM »

why make the handle for one hand or the other? if you weren't using sheep horn would you still make them for one hand or the other?
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« Reply #26 on: March 04, 2013, 07:01:43 PM »

Yes I burnish the edges of my sheath. The belt loop is also beveled on both sides to make insertion if the belt easier and so that the outside of the sheath will not rub on your hide while carrying the scabbard on your belt.

I also put three rivets in the belt loop in a triangular arrangement, the top of the triangle being toward the top of the belt loop. One rivet will tear out, two rivets will also tear out quicker than when all three are used. I use #14 rivets and burrs, these are the strongest rivets I have found. I never put a rivet in the top of the scabbard for they will tear out. The stitching is plenty strong enough and friendly to the leather.

I have thought about putting a stamp on the scabbards, then decided the leather is beautiful as it is so have not used one.
I will sign the back of a scabbard if the client requests it, but do not like to do so.

Taking advantage of the natural shape of the sheep horn requires a lot of planning but has its advantages in making each handle a unique expression of nature. The handles often take as much time as the knife, but are worth it in my opinion.

I made one handle out of paper micarta that has palm swells on both sides, and once thought about making a cast handle out of some mother of plastic, but decided against it. I dearly love sheep horn. If you are reading Blade in the next three months you will see much of the story of the development of a sheep horn handle.
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« Reply #27 on: March 04, 2013, 07:38:14 PM »

i want to be an explorer of all the materials usable for knife handles, and decide on a few that suit me best
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« Reply #28 on: March 04, 2013, 07:58:06 PM »

Thanks Ed I really appreciate the time you put to help guys like me understand. Cheesy I haven't read any of blade magazine and I haven't found someone who has but I wish I could find some and read em. I live in the southeast Minnesota about five miles from the Mississippi and I do make knives the first knife I made was when I was eight and that was out of aluminum the reason I know what I do(little as it is)know is because of your books Wayne's books and I'd be lost with out books and now I can ask guys like you and my knowledge has grown by leaps and bounds
now my knives are made of steel(isn't that great?) just kidding I'm WAY further than just steel there well designed (thanks to you),they cut longer,and I know why there designed the way they are so thank you I've got a long way to go but the road is fun so good times ahead--thanks Ed and the others out there!!  Wink  D-Vision l  
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« Reply #29 on: March 05, 2013, 08:01:05 PM »

Ed do you have a spot for blood or water to drain out of?
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