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Author Topic: mule deer hunter  (Read 4777 times)
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jared williams
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« on: August 21, 2011, 05:21:55 PM »

Here is one i finished up awhile ago. 52100 with all the fixings. Leather spacer with mule deer antler and scrub oak handle. This one is up for sale. If your interested just shoot me a PM.
 Or just enjoy looking!
   



* hunting knife 1.JPG (46.14 KB, 725x540 - viewed 362 times.)

* hunting knife 2.JPG (37.65 KB, 828x342 - viewed 355 times.)
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Gus Mundt
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« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2011, 06:11:54 PM »

Very nice!!  I love the looks of that blade, and i cant get over the handles you make fore your knives they are works of art!!
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Gustav Mundt
Harold Locke
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2011, 04:13:40 AM »

Jared,

Very beautiful lady, I am one of those that have to enjoy just looking. She is a testement to the beauty of from following function. As stateted before your ability to combine materials into the handle is a testement to your inspired craftmanship.

Harold Locke
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2011, 10:10:20 AM »

Jared you developed a very nice cap for that antler it all flows gracefully from tip to the but of the handle, I would love to hold her, she is very pleasing to the eye and appears to want to be held and used.

Nice Job!
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Ed Fowler High Performance Knives
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le skunk
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« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2011, 09:23:07 PM »

looks realy great

i bet feels great in hand

nice sheath work


beautiful work


bryan
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georgela1
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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2011, 09:03:16 AM »

Jared,

Beautifully done. The blending of the handle is inspiring. I like that you blended metal, animal and wood. Did I notice a slight curve to the ricasso? If so, I like it. It adds to the overall curvature lines of the knife. If it is not, I need to see an eye doctor but I like the idea anyway. I have been privilaged to see some of your work. You continue to add uniquesness to your knives. Something I feel is most important. You make it yours.

Thanks for sharing it.

George
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jared williams
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« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2011, 11:44:05 AM »

Thanks all for the comments. And yes George there is a sweep to the ricasso. I very much enjoy the look and feel of that style of ricasso.
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Phil Dwyer
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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2011, 12:00:13 AM »

It sure does call out to be held and put to use! If you don't mind my asking, how did you secure that cool looking wood butt cap to the antler?
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jared williams
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« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2011, 04:13:33 PM »

Phil,
  When i secured that butt cap i took the piece of antler and ground the curve that i wanted on my belt grinder until it looked pleasing to my eye. then i layed the antler on the side of the piece of scrub oak that i used for the cap and traced the outline of the curve onto the oak. after that i grind and sand and test fit until i get a nice tight fit with the butt cap. on this knife the tang extends down into the buttcap to help hold the cap on.it is very labor intensive doing it this way and not using jigs do fit everything up with but i very much enjoy refining my hand skills and taking the time to make it look good without jigs. it is a point of pride for me to say i didn't use any jigs when i fit up my laminated handles. and that it was all done freehand by eye.  maybe someday i'll start using jigs but i am just not ready to do that yet.

I had a machine shop teacher in high school who was taught by an old german guy how to be a machinist. he told me one of the things he was required to do before he could progress after a certain point in the class was to take a piece of 1-1/8" square bar and hand file it down to a 1" square cube that was flat and square to 1/1000th of an inch. he said his teacher could take a file and file off 1 or 2 thousandths off a piece of metal and keep it flat and perfect and he didn't have to put the part he was working on  in a jig on the mill to skim off the top. it would save him time and a headache.  that type of skill with the hand is becoming a dead art thanks to all the wonderfull tools we have at our disposal nowadays. for me personally i would like to have that type of hand skill so that i dont have to rely on so much equipment. and i just like to work with my hands more than machines.
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Phil Dwyer
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« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2011, 11:43:18 PM »

Thanks for the description Jared. I hear what you're saying about precision filing. I struggle with that. My high school metal smithing and jewelry making students REALLY struggle with it. I kind of figured you did that by hand. The whole knife seems to be a testament to its being hand made with that kind of attention. If I understood you correctly, the wooden butt cap has the tang terminating in it. I'm guessing there may be a friction fit to it, as well as an adhesive like epoxy?
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Phil Dwyer - Hawaii
jared williams
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« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2011, 06:23:32 AM »

the butt cap is epoxy'ed on before i attach the handle to the blade. then when i drill out the handle to fit the tang i can drill through all the differant parts that make up the handle. if done well i can get a very strong handle. with the tang going all the way through and connecting all the differant handle pieces. sometimes it's a real struggles to get it all to work that way.
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davidm
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« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2011, 11:09:39 AM »

Very nice job, Jared! Everything about it, just beautifully executed.  I was wondering if a threaded tang, take-down assembly might be something useful to consider for this type handle design- another approach..     
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