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Author Topic: Sheath tutorial: Chris Amos  (Read 19750 times)
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davidm
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« on: April 01, 2011, 11:16:23 PM »

Chris is going to show how a Fowler-style pouch sheath is made. He is going to comment on the steps, i
will introduce the photos in order he has sent these to me.

The knife he is making this for is a left handed knife but i requested he make a right handed sheath for it, since i use it as a righty. Here goes..Thanks Chris!
 






   

« Last Edit: April 01, 2011, 11:19:27 PM by David Mullikin » Logged
SBranson
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« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2011, 01:36:14 AM »

Thanks for doing this guys! Smiley  I'm looking forward to the stitching part particularly.
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caknives
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« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2011, 01:46:07 AM »

Ok so this isn't exactly a "fowler" sheath but we will make it in the same style using materials that anyone can get a hold of. It is a pouch style sheath which is the most secure and easiest to use in most situations. Ed uses waxed harness leather. It comes in natural varied thickness and gets run through a leather splitter to whatever thickness is needed. This will be regular veg. tanned leather about 8 to 10 ounces. It is what is most readily available. Wherever we vary from Ed's style or materials I will try to point it out. This is not the only way to make a sheath, just the way that Ed has showed me and i prefer. ( I can make u a waxed leather version later David but i didn't have any right now.)

The first step is to make a pattern out of paper. Fold your paper in half, this will give you a center line that will form the spine of the sheath. Lay your blade with the spine on the fold and trace the blade. This tells you how the knife will lay in the sheath. Then give yourself about 1/2 inch extra for the welt, the leather that will protect the stitches from being cut when the knife goes in and out of the sheath. Ad your belt flap and you have your pattern. The way this flap is cut allows for enough support for the sheath to ride solid on your hip, and the length gives room to move when sitting or riding in a truck.

Lay it out on your leather and remember which way it goes, right or left, I've made more than one sheath backwards! LOL Grin I like to use a razor knife to cut out my pattern. Next using the "extra" you have allowed yourself on your pattern to cut out a piece for your welt. It should be about 1/4 inch thick to protect the stitching, and you, from the blade. Since the leather we are using is thinner I will cut out multiple pieces and glue them up to make a thicker welt. The top will be thicker to account for the width of the guard and handle, and taper to the tip of the sheath. (With the full side of waxed harness leather you can simply select a thick section of scrap to make your welt.)
« Last Edit: April 02, 2011, 02:45:47 AM by caknives » Logged

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caknives
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« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2011, 02:13:19 AM »

Once you are happy with the shape and size use the center line fold in your pattern to mark the center of your sheath on the INSIDE. Then saturate the OUTSIDE with saddle soap and fold the belt flap and the sheath to form the basic shape. I like to clamp in the vise GENTLY between 2 boards, Ed uses the trim from the leather splitter and a special set of jaws to clamp up sheaths. ( Hopefully he can put up some pics for us.  Wink ) Let both dry for 15 to 20 minutes and then you are ready to attach the loop. You should clamp gently and carefully because once you dent or mark your leather you will have to live with that mark forever!

Next we use 3 copper rivets to secure the flap. 3 is the magic number for strength and durability. Ed can tell you about his reasoning for 3 but i have never seen it fail so i'm a believer. Be sure to trim your rivets to about 1/16 above the retaining washer for best results. Longer tends to bend before it is tight and this will leave the head sticking up above the leather on the inside of the sheath and this can mar your blade. Support the head of the rivet on a solid object, i usually use the edge of my anvil but as you can see any piece of steel will do. A small ball-peen hammer works best for me to swell the rivet and mushroom it out to hold the flap down securely. I work in a circular pattern very lightly until the rivet is secure and the head is flush on the inside of the sheath.

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davidm
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« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2011, 02:23:51 AM »

Posting these in groups




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davidm
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2011, 02:32:33 AM »

Next group. Loving it!  Grin 





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davidm
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2011, 02:46:14 AM »

Next set: 





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caknives
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« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2011, 02:55:51 AM »

Look'n good david thanks! I've got some better pics of the next steps on my camera. Found it! I will try to get them posted tomorrow night. I've got an early day tomorrow, got a 3D archery shoot in texas canyon, wish me luck, i'm gonna need it! If you guys have any questions up to this point, about why or how, or something else you want to see let me know. I'm sure between Ed and i we can get you an answer.
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davidm
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« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2011, 04:14:26 AM »

Thanks Chris! i am enjoying watching the process. It is a part of the craft i've never heard explained, step-by-step. Great photos!  
Questions:
So far, by photos what adhesives are in use?  And what tool do you use to taper the small section of the welt?
  
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caknives
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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2011, 04:36:20 AM »

I'm using Barge Cement, for leather etc. I'm using the blue which is toluene free. Ed uses the original which is still available. Both work well and remain flexible over time and offer excellent adhesion. I tapered the welt with a razor blade, since i'm "shopless" right now. In a perfect world i would use a fresh 36 grit belt on the grinder.
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PhilL
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« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2011, 03:04:06 PM »

Great tutorial guys.
I want to watch the stitching segment very closely.
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Dennis Mashburn
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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2011, 04:36:19 PM »

Great job guys.

How long is the piece for the belt loop?  On the few sheaths I have made, I seem to always get that piece a little short.

Where do you get the barge cement?  I haven't seen any in my area in a while, but it does work great.

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davidm
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« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2011, 05:03:52 PM »

Found this: 
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=1390196
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Gus Mundt
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« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2011, 01:53:18 AM »

It is great to see how people make their sheaths!!  I can not wait to see the stitching when you get to that part, great post!!
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« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2011, 11:18:20 PM »

Yes!
I want to see stitching too!
Especially the tools that are used for stitching!
I saw Craig Barr's video on sheath making.
He is using a single hook instead of two needles.
Somebody told me that Ed was using the same tool.
I'd like to see a picture(s) of it.
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