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Author Topic: Shop Construction  (Read 2309 times)
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larnotlars
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« on: July 22, 2010, 09:33:30 PM »

Hey All!

I was wondering if I could get some opinions on my future shop.  I am talking to contractors for the pad, and have heard different things on the need for reinforcement for a concrete pad.  One contractor says that a 5 inch standard pad is fine with a power hammer on it, others have recommended upgrades either in depth (6 inch), rebar (24 inch centered rebar instead of wire), or a fiberglass mesh addition.  Has any one researched what is needed to stand up to a power hammer's stress.  At this point, I do not have one, and only hand forge, but at some point I will probably want to speed things up.

Thanks for your help!

Lar    

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davidm
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« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2010, 04:01:03 AM »

Hi Lar,
Welcome to the forum! Surely you'll get some ideas what works best. Here's one related thread, which may provide an idea or two:    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=619103&highlight=hammer
one more..

http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=748859&highlight=little+giant
« Last Edit: July 23, 2010, 04:06:38 AM by David Mullikin » Logged
larnotlars
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« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2010, 10:18:34 PM »

Thanks for the links David! I wish that is was more optimistic sounding... From the diagrams, they recommend a 20 inch reinforced pad below the 50lb.  I sent an email to Sid asking him if there was a viable work around... I can't triple (6 inch with 24 inch center rebar is the top of what $ I have available) my slab cost without giving up on the building. It seems like most of the comments on the other thread just build a 4*4 pad and didn't worry about the concrete thickness, but that seems scary considering the recommendations.

Sigh!

Lar
« Last Edit: July 23, 2010, 10:21:57 PM by larnotlars » Logged

Ever since I took up forging, I have noticed that I am much less likely to hit my thumb with the hammer! 8-$
jared williams
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2010, 11:02:10 PM »

i would say you have 2 options.
1-figure out where you will eventually put yout hammer and pour a thickened slab just in the area that it will go leaving the rest of your floor at a 5" pad.

2-pour your floor at 5" which is plenty thick for your floor and eventually when you get your hammer, cut a 4'x4' square in the floor where the hammer will go dig it down 20" and pour the footing. a benefit of doing it this way is that the rest of your floor wont crack from the vibration of the hammer because the hammer will be sitting on its own independent footing.

Jared
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Harold Locke
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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2010, 11:14:51 PM »

Lar,

I hope that Ed picks up on this thread. His present shop houses 3 power hammers and when a hammer is working there is no notice of vibration. The pad just for the hammer sounds like a great idea, and can it can be dampened and seperated from the main slab. Great plan Jared!

Harold Locke
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larnotlars
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« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2010, 03:37:10 AM »

I think that Jared's idea just made this project seem wonderful again! I've been exchanging Emails with Keri & Sid at little giant asking them to clarify what is needed, but so far I haven't managed to phrase the question correctly for them.

Thanks everyone for helping brain storm!!!!
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2010, 06:20:01 AM »

The main thing is to pad your power hammer, 1 inch plywood or an old trailer mat or even a new one is great. I ran my 50 pound-er on a 5 inch cement floor that was over 60 years old with no reinforcement sitting on a 1" piece of plywood for over 20 years with no adverse effects to the concrete. When we poured our slab for the new shop there is about 2 feet of reinforced concrete where we intended to place the Beaudry, but have not moved the Beaudry yet.

The beaudry sits on a 3 foot deep block of reinforced concrete and it does shake the block. Could it still work on a slab with less concrete, probably - yes.
One thing be sure to bolt the hammer down solid, that makes a lot of difference!
Jared's idea of the cuts in the floor is also a good idea, we did that on ours and they have separated from the rest of the slab.

I watched a 100 lb little giant operate on a dirt floor with cables tied to the walls to keep it upright. It worked well and shook the snow off of the roof. At the other extreme I saw a 25 pound little giant mounted on a 3 foot deep block of concrete.

Little Grey, the 50 lb little giant was only bolted down to a piece of 1 inch plywood that was not anchored to the floor, you had to follow it around as it walked while hammering, but it worked well.
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larnotlars
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2010, 04:53:08 AM »

Thanks for the clarification Ed! I feel better about my options!

I don't think that I have to worry about finding a 250lb'er in my price range for a while. (Although I am putting in 10 ft high trusses just in case...)

I did get a funny story from the people at Little Giant... They had a 25 lb LG that they went to pick up and found that they couldn't move it even with no visible bolts... turns out that the owner put it on 3 sheets of tar paper... They said it took 3 people with crow bars to free it...

I can't wait to have such problems!!!

Lar
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larnotlars
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« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2010, 03:19:21 AM »

A final note, I got an email back from the Little Giant people, and they thought that a 6 inch reinforced pad (rebar) with a 4 x 4 platform under the base should be fine for a 25 lb LG.

Thanks again for all the ideas!

Lar
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« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2010, 05:35:24 PM »

One of the most convenient aspects of my new shop is running water. It sure is nice not to have carry it from the house. Naturally I really like my full bath set up and living quarters.
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larnotlars
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« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2010, 10:53:02 PM »

That is awful nice as well!  I thought about that, but we're nearing the top of the potential budget... electricity is going to have to be put off for a while... I don't think plumbing is an option. Fortunately, the door will be 20 feet or so from the back door of the house... I do plan of putting in a beverage fridge in as soon as it's wired!  Ed & Chris can tell you how much Diet Coke I go through on a given day!
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Harry Mathews
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« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2010, 01:22:50 AM »

As long as I remember to fill the jug up, our shop has running water.
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Harry Mathews
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larnotlars
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« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2010, 04:25:05 PM »

WoooooHooooo!

Foundation excavation is underway! Garage is prefab, so it should be going up next week!

Did I mentions WooooooHooooo!
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« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2010, 05:34:02 PM »

Truly shinning times! If you consider it a future convenience, it won't cost much to have them place a water line through the foundation, as well as sewer, you don't have to hook them up, but if you decide to do so later it will be much cheaper and quicker if the hardware is in place.
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