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Author Topic: Military knives  (Read 3770 times)
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radicat
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« on: February 09, 2007, 04:46:10 AM »

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radicat
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2008, 06:54:39 AM »

I came across this pic of a knife in a stock photo catalog with kitchen knives.. It was described as a rusty kitchen knife or dagger. I think it deserves better recognition for what it is. I do not know anything about it. I will make the fairly safe assertion that it is a military knife. Maybe as a joint effort we can do it justice. Where was it made? Who made it? What was its purpose? What are its attributes? Could it perform its intended purpose well? All good questions, but there must be more.

It was photographed upside down and as a large photo. I tried to zoom in on the side of the butt to see if I could make out something etched or scratched in it, but to no avail. If that would help to match a marking found on a similar knife later, we can look closer.


* b14knifeR1.gif (59.03 KB, 800x201 - viewed 289 times.)
« Last Edit: June 21, 2008, 08:01:05 AM by radicat » Logged
radicat
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« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2008, 08:07:02 AM »

I'm not showing the original because it is twice the size as these and would probably make your browser crazy anyway.  This is an inverted view. Notice the flat top on the guard. Or, is it notched?


* b14knifeR.gif (59.26 KB, 800x201 - viewed 295 times.)
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caknives
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« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2008, 02:14:17 PM »

It looks to be a modified bayonet of some sort, the pic is terrible but the thickness of the guard and the deep fuller in the blade are a good clue, it also look like the butt is of the metal type, ( bad pic) that would have the notch to lock on the under lug of the barrel. Most of this style were for a mauser of some sort but with no markings who knows, could be german polish or egyptian. No barrel ring so it was uses as a side knife / trench or whatever as some point, we may never know but I love the hunt for these clues too. maybe this is the push I need to buy a military knives book ...  Anyone out there have one ?
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radicat
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« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2008, 03:48:38 PM »

You're right. The photo is bad. And, it lost clarity in the size reduction. Maybe a cutting of the original will help. Zooming in justs distorts it.


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« Last Edit: June 21, 2008, 04:06:44 PM by radicat » Logged
radicat
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2008, 04:15:21 PM »

Maybe it's my imagination, but I keep seeing some marking on the butt side. It may be nothing.


* b14knifecroppedinvert.gif (55.31 KB, 612x213 - viewed 277 times.)
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radicat
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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2008, 05:00:40 PM »

The top edge may be sharpened back to the end of the fuller. Also, in looking back at the full photo the fuller ends seem to be shaped the same.


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* b14knifepointinvert.gif (25.57 KB, 398x152 - viewed 267 times.)
« Last Edit: June 21, 2008, 05:13:22 PM by radicat » Logged
Ebbtide
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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2008, 08:37:05 PM »


Looks  a wee bit like the WW2 German Bayonet (the smallest, horizontal bayonet in my photo), with the point altered.
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radicat
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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2008, 10:49:24 PM »

You may be onto something. Are there any markings on your knife? It's worth mentioning that the features of a knife may be similar because the same type of machinery was used to make them. That piece of machinery (whatever) may have only been used in a particular region. Were fullers generally pressed into  steel or machined? I've seen some that I could not say one way or the other.  It seems that the ends of a fuller are a clue as to the process used. If the scales on our knife have been changed, the grooves in the wood may have been added because the originals had them. The rivets/pins are crudely done on our knife, which may be an indication of an amateur re-handle.
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Ebbtide
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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2008, 09:45:56 PM »

IIRC the only marking was a serial# and an "E"
I'll check it soon.
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