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Author Topic: Eureka moment!  (Read 888 times)
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davidm
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« on: October 06, 2009, 04:03:37 AM »

Kayote and Harry got me thinking about the "collector" things in knives, where it all adds up someone liking something more than something else..
So, i was just stting here thinking i wonder how much legitimate science is behind the "flat grind" style? ..it is popular. But in what cases is it the "ideal" grind, -as it is often used by celebrity MS smiths?

..so as i was trying to formulate a few questions, here to ask.
What about flexibility- it must surely excell in this, better than a full convex grind? ..then, (bear w/ me), i started thinking the convex grind must be rigid and inflexible by comparison. 

Then it hit me. Ed's modified Price grind! It allows for the greater flexibility a full convex grind cannot, by reversing the direction of the grind. What an ideal solution!  (And he mentioned this, in a Blade lecture i saw only about 6 years ago, i now remember)
What a dummy i've been!   

So, is this the idea, adding greater flexibility?

-the real Eureka moment happened just a few minutes after, i've been doing some studying on violins, reading about the acoustic research into sound. Sam Zygmuntowicz, one of todays true talents of violin- making analyzes the violin like a patient.  (watch video..)

Don't the plates of the instrument look like he's using the same principles, trying to get sound out of the violin as Ed's Modified grind. Curves match!

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=awUssXVo6Sk&hl=en&gl=US&client=mv-google
David    

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JimmyR
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« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2009, 06:35:14 AM »

I believe Ed told me that the modified price grind is employed chiefly for splitting the sternum and other tissue connected bones of various animals. I do believe you are right about it giving the knives flexibility though.
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