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Author Topic: Thanks Chris!  (Read 2479 times)
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Mike_H
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« on: June 05, 2009, 05:26:47 PM »

Just got the fire bricks today.  didn't expect you to hollow them out for me.  Now though, this begs a question, how on earth am I to keep them together? LOL!  the masking tape won't hold for long I think.

Again, thanks.  Just one more critical step ( the anvil) and I can start forging. Grin    

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caknives
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2009, 06:37:13 PM »

LOL Roll Eyes Thats up to you, I welded up a frame for mine but a few wraps of any wire will do just fine, glad they got there! Keep us up to date on your forging progess.
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Mike_H
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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2009, 06:22:34 AM »

Will do, just need that damned anvil and then I can get started.  Just not sure where to get something usable.  Ah well, maybe my father-in-law would know.  He knows a lot of scrap yards and such.  Who knows.
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caknives
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2009, 10:27:08 AM »

Good luck ! Any solid piece of steel will do. You can get a 55 # at harbor frieght / buffalo tools for about 60 bucks. Not the best, but fine for getting started. I started with a piece of rail road track from the scrap yard, used it for years.  Be creative!
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JimmyR
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2009, 09:31:10 PM »

Chris, can you give me some tips for making an affordable setup as well? For instance, I don't know which type of torch is powerful enough to act as a good heat supply.  Also, do you know if a treadle hammer is similar in oomph to a power hammer? Thank ya sir.
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Mike_H
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« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2009, 06:15:58 AM »

Jimmy, get wayne Goddard's The $50 Knife shop.  I did and it helped a lot.

One brick forge with 16 oz bernz-o-matic propane tank, some form of cheap anvil and a good hammer is really all ya need.
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Ed Fowler
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« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2009, 08:06:58 AM »

If we use our heads when we purchase knife making equipment, it is an investment that will not lose value. Today I could sell most of my equipment for more than I paid for it and have had the use of it for years. Naturally we must work with our means, and sometimes convincing our brides as to the wisdom of our investment is a challenge. It takes time and knife making is not a big money making operation but being your own boss and spending time with your family instead of working away from home can be good times.

There are plans around for treadle hammers, I don't have any but I imagine you can find them on the Internet. Wayne Goddard made some that worked very well - you might give him a call and get his thoughts on design and construction.
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Mike_H
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« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2009, 03:35:52 PM »

well, fired up the forge today.  The torch I got won't heat the entire length of the bricks.  It's just the bare basic burnz-o-matic torch we sell at wal-mart.  I'll buy the mini MAPP torch that Lowes sells in a few weeks.  Still need an anvil though, I hope to remedy that tuesday.
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Israel
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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2009, 04:40:58 PM »

mike, i have used the fire brick forge, in fact Chris gave it to me and a friend. we used the same torch but have the tip with the hose on it. this allows you to move the tip to where you get the best flame in the forge. some questions though, are you putting the tip in the hole or just outside? you want it to be just outside the hole, about a 1/4", helps with the fuel/ air mix. you also have to play with the angle of the tip to get the best heat.  also, it's not going to get very hot between the opening and the flame hole. with the mapp it does perform better, but you should be able to do something with the regular gas.
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Mike_H
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« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2009, 05:13:48 PM »

I was able to heat up about 1.5" of mild steel bar to forging temp.  pounded it on a wood stump (no real fire thankfully).  but I should be getting the MAPP torch this week.  Gotta love the share bonus from wal-mart.
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JimmyR
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« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2009, 08:59:42 PM »

Metal can be drawn on wood? I never would have known.
I do indeed have Wayne Goddard's $50 knife shop, but I'm a little if-y about his methods for certain reasons. Then again, the one brick forge is not a bad idea for a beginner like me. (thank you for your input)
The thing that I'm most worried about affording is a quality belt sander. There are blueprints to build a,"no weld grinder," for sale on various sites, but I'm unsure how much the raw materials would cost me.
My parents are now not to happy about me getting a treadle hammer after I explained the loudness of it's operation. (nuts)

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Mike_H
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« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2009, 04:42:47 AM »

it did burn the wood slightly but yeah, I did it on a chunk of maple. Grin  Might post a vid on youtube about it at some point.

As far as a grinder goes, look at wayne'ss book again.  He as a wood framed version that would work quite well from the looks of it.

you really don't need a power hammer unless you're drawing out steel like Ed use to do with ball bearings for 52100.  But Wayne has in his other book a foot powered hammer.  no hydrolics or electricity needed.  It can excert 2-4 times the force of your foot depending on how it's put together.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2009, 04:46:06 AM by Mike_H » Logged
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