Knife Talk Online Forums

KNIFE TALK => Ed's Thoughts => : Ed Fowler January 16, 2018, 10:21:30 AM

: Knife for springs test.
: Ed Fowler January 16, 2018, 10:21:30 AM
Every year we have a get together of HEPK Smiths who wish to bring something that they have made that will have some special kind of treatment that will reveal something different to those who want to test it. This is my first knife that will be tested, it was over heated before quenching and left a super hardened area that climbs right to the spine. We will test it to destruction this spring. I invite all who are interested to bring something special and share in the learning from what it has to teach us.

: Re: Knife for springs test.
: mreich March 06, 2018, 04:22:25 PM
Ed, I can't delete this blade from my memory bank. It's just gorgeous. I love every curve she has, and the plunge line is.... well, it's better than a low cut blouse.

I totally understand what it feels like to accept something you've already rejected, so I can't ask for this blade. I would if I could though.

I realize it's probably just me, and I know you've made hundreds of "perfect" blades...

: Re: Knife for springs test.
: Ed Fowler March 10, 2018, 11:04:47 AM
You can have her after the test, maybe you could straighten her out and get some use out of her. Actually I have other blades on the way for you to chose from, handles and all!! But she will be here or with you, looking at her she really has quite a story to tell, I will try to get some better photos and post them up.

To be honest I kind of like her myself!!

: Re: Knife for springs test.
: mreich March 18, 2018, 07:44:34 PM
Ed, I've been thinking this ever since you posted a picture of this blade, but I haven't said anything.

Really, those shiny spots look a lot like simple decarb to me. Yes, decarb goes deeper if you get something a little too warm, but I don't think it hurts the underlying steel at all.

You can see whether or not it's decarb even with low power magnification, like a 10X loupe. The surface will look kind of like a layer of shiny, teeny ball bearings. I don't know how else to describe it.

If you take the surface back down to 220 grit, then progress with the finish as normal, at least in my experience, those shiny areas will totally disappear with the subsequent etch.

I don't think it matters to the underlying steel. It's not like you can hold it at a high temp long enough to cause grain growth at all.

I'm just been thinking about it for a while, trying to imagine what could cause the shinier spots, and remembered that's happened to me.

You know, we had the spring rendezvous on the first of April last year, and Annie and I liked to spend our anniversary down there with our friends. :)

Also, I designed a new blade clamp for torque wrench attachment, and I'm eager to see what you think of it!

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